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Full text of "Newmarket Era and Express"

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AURORA NEWS 



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S*i» ffimiHn, mmu w m mul lenocn or north york 



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Number of Copies 

Printed This Week 

4,300 






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I00m YEAR, EXraESS-HERALO 57TH YEAR 



NO. I 



NEWMARKET. ONTARIO. FRIDAY, JANUARY 4, 1952 



SINGLE COPIES 5 CENTS EACH 



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HEREFORD f*3 NEW *EA*'S DAY SPECIAL ON WILTON FARM 




the Era And Express 
Marks 100th Year Of 



ERA AND EXPRESS ENTERS I00TH YEAR BENEDICT'S DELIGHT 







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The Era and Expu*s will celebrate its 100th 
birthday this year. The oldest weekly paper in York . 
county was founded in 1852 by G. S. Porter who, 
according to popular legend, came to Newmarket that 
year on the first train to come this far. 

Col. W. P. Mulock, owner of 
the Newmarket Express Herald, 
became a partner in the owner- 
ship of the Era and Express when 

the Era and the Express Herald 
were amalgamated in 1942. In 
1946, he bought Mr. Hebb's share 



The paper was founded under 
the name of The New Era. The 

name was changed to The New- 
market Era, it is believed, when 
Newmarket was incorporated as 

a village in 1857. The name was 



changed again when the Era ab- of the business ana became sole 
sorbed the Newmarket Express 
Herald in 1942, and became the 
Newmarket Era and Express. 



Erastus Jackson became editor 
of The New Era in 1853 or 1854 
and in the I830*s, his son, Lyman, 
succeeded him. Lyman Jackson 
retained the editorship of the pa- 
per until the early 1930*s when 
Arthur Hawkes became editor. 
In 1934, Andrew Olding Hebb 
purchased the paper and remain- 
ed editor until 1944 when he be- 
came editor of the Rural Co-Op- 
erator although still retaining his 
partnership in the Era and Ex- 



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Twin bull calves on New Year's day was a big event on the farm of G. A. Wilton 
ad Sons, breeders of polled Hereford cattle. George Wilton, 21, son of Albert Wilton, 
is shown with the two lively grade calves on the third day. Mother, calves and owners 
are all doing well- It was the first time in 57 years that twin bull calves were born on 
the Wilton farm which is situated on Old Yonge St at the top of the Holland Landing 
hill. George Wilton's grandfather first settled on the farm 57 years ago. One of the 
twins was born at 5 p.m. New Year's day, the other shortly before midnight. 
1 Era and Express photo 



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MAYOR JOSEPH VALE ON K.C. LIST 



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Newmarket's mayor, Joseph Vale, was included in a 
list of lawyers who have been named as King's Counsel. 
Hie announcement at the beginning of the new year was 
made by Hon. Dana Porter, attorney-general. Mr. Vale is 
a mernber of the law firm Mathews, Stiver, Lyons and Vale 
♦t Newmarket. Photo by Budd 



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COMING EVENTS 



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4 — Progressive 

under auspice* of Queens- 

▼Ule Women's Institute In the 

•cfeool room, Queensville, 845 p.m. 

Praw for Institute qutit. Good 

c2w52 
T— Brownies wilt 
play at meeting of Scout- 
Go irte Mothers* auxiliary,. Scout 
Hal!, 8 o'clock. Light refresh- 
ments. Cordial invitation extend- 
ed to public -. ciwl 

. *— Annual meet- 
York County Hospital 
Women's Auxiliary in Agricultural 
Board rooms, Botsford St., 3 p.m. 
*Tttt wttl be served. Public wel- 
come, clwl 
TutMar, Stau s— The Red Cross 
WW quilt and sew In Trinity 
tfaited Church, Newmarket, from 
W ; > m -_ to 5 P-m. Lunch, clwl 

» * — Progressive 

ana cribbage party at 

H*rj, under auspices of 

Women's Institute. Good 

Time ais pa. clwl 

*J. «p U-Euchm and 500 

gtrty to Mount Albert Communitr 




Lunch, clwl 

W«tar*d*y, <J»». 8 — Bingo in 
Newmarket Canadian I-ej»ion, at 8 
p.m. Shnre-the*wealth. Jackpot 
$10. 20 games 35e. Free bus after 
bingo. clwl 

Wednesday, fan. »— Bingo, King 
Masonic HnH, 8.30 sharp; 16 
Karnes for 35c f specials, shnre-the- 
wealth, jackpot 512. Ladles Aux- 
iliary of King Legion, 438. clwl 

Danrin* every Friday night at 

Churchill Community hall, Mod- 
ern and old tyme. Norm Burling** 
orchestra. Admission 50c. tfl 

Every Thursday nfjrht, euchre. 
Bingo every Saturday. Time 8.30 
pjn. Under auspices Keswick 
Hockey Club. tfl 

Eaekr* every We4neaUy at S 

p.m-, to Roche's Point Memorial 
Club. Admission 35c Every 
Thursday, at 9 p.m., dancing, ad- 
mission 50c. Every Friday, at 8 
pjn^ pictures, admission 25c tf40 
Daadfis; every 8*Jur4ay night 
in Mount Albert hall to Norm 
Burling and hU Kuanmen 
orchseJra. Modern and old time 
dancing; Jackpot and other spe- 
cial prixes. A iood time for alL 
Agjnfsskjn SOe. Time pjn. tit 



GRAY BUSES STOP 
AS STRIKE CALLED 
AT 5 A.M. TODAY 

Commuters to Toronto from 
Newmarket and district were de- 
pendent upon Good Samaritans 
with cars to get to work this 
morning as the T.T.C. and Gray 
Coach employees went on strike 
at 5 a.m. 

Between 20 and 30 regular 
early morning commuters from 
Newmarket were picked up at 
the bus terminal this morning by 
friends with cars or else returned 
home to get their own cars when 
they learned that the regular bus 

wouldn't be stirring from its 
garage. 

Newmarket taxis picked up a 
good many residents from Hoi. 
land Landing who usually ride 
to work in town on the early 
morning "work bus," 

Some students wore stranded 
Xtyo by lack of bus service. The 
bus from Beaverton picks up 
students for the high school 
along the lake shore and down 
the third. Most of them were 
fcble to hitch rides to school, 
however. 

John Mines, Gray Coach super- 
visor, was on duty as usual but 
instead of sending buses on their 
way, he was doing his best to 
arrange pick up service for 
stranded commuters. 




ownert 

John Meyer, who succeeded 
Mr. Hebb as editor in 1944, has 
retained that position since. 

During its 100 years, the Era 
and Express has won many hon- 
ors as well as establishing pre- 
cedents in the newspaper busi- 
ness. It was the first Ontario 
weekly to put its circulation on ! 
a paid-in-advance basis, and it 
was the first weekly of its circu- 
lation level to become a member 
of the Audit Bureau of Circula- 
tion. 

;■ The importance of the AiBXJ. 
membership cannot be over-esti- 
mated. It assures advertisers and 

others who use the paper that its 

publisher's circulation claims%re 

honest. 

; The paper has been a regular 

contestant in better newspaper 

eompeilaSos WSPj* during the last 

20 years, has cor>.j? ,led an enyi " 
able record. In M 193 ?» and 
1930, the paper won the -. tar,cs 
Clark trophy for the best Ca^ 
dian weekly newspaper of less 
than 2,000 circulation; the Pearce 
L trophy for the best Ontario week- 
ly editorial page in 1942i / 

The paper won the tegfie 
Memorial trophy for the best 
editorial page of Ontario and 
Quebec weeklies in 1950 and^i951, 
and the David Williams trophy 
for the best editorial page of a 
Canadian weekly of its wcuja-: 
'.ton class. •'.' - .-'. ;' --. . 

Witfcii ihl«?$^g^^w^foUIld^i 
cd, t'h'elpbbulaiiOn^^Newlmnret' 





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Wedded 



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Basil McHale died Saturday, 
Mr. McHale's passing will be 
mourned by many. In his young- 
er days, he was a prominent ball 
player. He was a butcher by 
trade and worked In many New- 
market stores. 



was 500, and circulation of ; the 
paper, further limited By the. 
number of those who could not 
read, was small. Since then, the 
paper has steadily expanded un- 
til now it prints vveokly over 
4,300 copies and the paper is on 
sale from King City to- Sutton, 
and from Schomberg to Mount 
Albert* 



Men Only 

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Hardened arteries, arthritic 
joints and dormant ulcers will 
get a workout this winter when 
the newly organized North Gwil- 
limbury married men's hockey 
league creaks into action this 
week In the Keswick arena. 

A nine-game schedule, if they 
last that long, Is planned. At a 

meeting last week, teams from 
KesVVick, Jersey and Roche's 
Point were accepted .and an 
age limit of 90 was set. 

'It was unanimously decided 
that no bachelor . would be al- 
lowed to disgrace himself by 
sneaking in. A suggestion that 
doctors and ambulance be in 
constant attendance at all league 
games was indignantly voted 
down but an appropriation for " 
a first aid kid was passed with- 
out dissent. . 

| First game in the new elague 
will be played in the Keswick 
arena tonight, Friday, Jan. 4. 
Game time is 8 p.m. 

The opening dish will match 
Jersey's "six oldsters" against 
Roche's Point's "six 1ml f -dead 
crocks'*. Keswick tottering six 
were lucky enough to draw a 
bye but .will get into action a 
week hence. 

Horace Brown of Jersey was 
elected president of the newly 
formed: circuit and Perry Winch 
Jr. of: Keswick was named sec- . 
retary-trensuer, * /."'/. * v 

The league executive boast of 

one rule that does not appear 

elsewhere in the hockey books 

and that is "any player under 30 

m - n cc- - i* i I who trips an opponent over 70 

: As* the sign q\W fn£ ***! .and Express of f ice indicates, | W M receive an automatic mis- 
this newspaper mark* its lOOtti i'vthday this year. It has conduct penalty", 
been: published evferjj; week for a century and is the oldest 
Weekiy^ifr ^Ht ^^t^ In 1852 it was started as "Tlie 
Ne\v Br^' by its fuSt edifo^ <S. S. Portei% who was printer 
mid publisher. Ttesppulation ot Newmarket at that time 
[wa^rt^ 



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Rev. F.R. Alen 

Inducted At St. Andrews Church 



GEORGE ROBITAILLE DIES 




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RETIRES AFTER 30 YEARS 

After 30 years of service as 
trustee, almost all of them in the 
office of secretary - treasurer, 
Dominic Speziali has decided it 
is time to step down and this 
year, at the nomination meeting 
of the Union S. S. 24 King and 2 
East Gwillimbury, he declined 
nomination. He had never been 
defeated. His eldest son John 
has taken his place on the board 
of Leo Catania and Dalton Gra- 
ham. 



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An induction service for the 
new minister. Rev. Fred R. Mere- 
dith was held at St. Andrew's 
Presbyterian church, -Newmar- 
ket, last night. Rev. Meredith, 
who comes to Newmarket from 
Bowmanville, formerly held 
charges in Montreal, Halifax and 

other centres in Ontario. 

The moderator, Rev. McRob- 
erts. Queen St., Toronto, the 
clerk. Dr. McCree, Toronto, and 
other Presbyters of the East To- 
ronto presbytery, conducted the 
service. 

Rev. McRoberts performed the 

ceremony of induction and the 
sermon was taken by Rev. Coles, 
Oshawa. Dr. W. Orr Mulligan, 
Aurora, who has been interim 



HEALTH UNIT CHIEF 
TO ADDRESS LANDING 
H. AND S> ASSOC* 

Dr. R. M. Xing t director of the 

York County Health Unit, will be 

I the guest speaker at the Holland 

k s ^ 4 • . Landing Home and School Aaso- 

fSjcxXA/ AAifltKT&r ciation meeting in the commUn- 
, f C W / / III Ud&C*!/ ity hall on Jan. % at 8 p.m. Dr. 

King will speak on the adminis- 
tration of the health unit 

Officers and members of East 
Gwillimbury township groups 
have been invited to this meet- 
ing and a cordial invitation is ex- 
tended to the public. 

East Gwillimbury is not a 
member of the health unit al- 
though all nearby municipalities 
with exception of King and 
Whitchurch are. Dr. King's ad- 
dress will tell of the work done 
by the unit, its cost, and other 
details. 



moderator of the Kirk Session 
during the pulpit vacancy at St. 
Andrew's, also spoke. 

Rev. Meredith is taking over 
the pulpit at St Andrew's 
church, left vacant by Dr. M. E. 
R. Boudreau who accepted a call 
to Winnipeg in the spring. Rev. 
Meredith w,5U be taking both 
services at the church this com- 
ing Sunday. 

A reception was held after the 
service when the ladies of the 

church served refreshments. 

Neil Ferris, clerk of the ses- 
sions, thanked Dr. Mulligan for 

his offices as interim moderator. 

Mr. Ferris and Mrs. J. Greer re- 
ceived guests. 



START NEW BRIDGE 

Work has been started this 

week by Ward and Allan Co., 
contractors, on a new bridge on 
Timothy St. R, near the fair 
grounds. A bridge on Welling- 
ton St has been completed. 



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ARTICLE FEATURES 
JOSEPH McCULLEY 

A story about Joseph Mc- 
CuIIey, former headmaster of 
Pickering College, is the featured 
article in New Liberty magazine 
Hi is month. 

Under the title "Big Man of 
the Big House", the article de- 
scribes the . work Joe McCullcy 
is doing as Senior Deputy Com- 
missioner of Penitentiaries in the 
Department of Justice. He left 
Newmarket and Pickering Col. 
lege in 1B47 when this appoint- 
ment was made, 

Mr. McCulley*s worW is con-. 
ccrned with education within the 
prisons bjtt his efforts are also 
strongly devoted to keeping men 
out of prison. Statistics show a 
decrease in repeaters and im- 
provement in these statistics can 
be brought about by education in 
prisons ?hat will equip men to 
support themselves honestly, he 
say* / 






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A well known figure in Newmarkot passed away on 
Monday, Dec. 81, in the person of George Robitattle, D'Arcy 
St, Mr. RobitaiHe was an enthusiastic sportsman In his 
younger days and in this picture taken several years ago, is 
pictured with two of his dogs. He managed the old town 
rink at the north end and had a reputation for making extra 
fine ice, " ' ' 



Aurora Boars were boasted from D to C rating by an O.H.A, sub-committee ruling 
at year end because of the use of three Newmarket payers, Bob Hannn, Ken. Burke and 
Bob Forhan. O.H.A, decision came after a Fergus protest. "Not worried" was the 
comment of the Aurora executive, "we had a choice of dropping the Newmarket pjayem 
or being moved up. We chose going up, ha ve a good team and we think our chances in 
C art just as good as in D," Bears king-pins, 1, to r, s Andy Closs, manaier/J0n» li f ^* rn ". 
trw, coach, and Jimmy Wilson, president, were still smiling when the ftflsi ~ 
fought from behind a 7-1 deficit to flatten Nobleton li-7. '.'<,'; : A iV&m m ■' 



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Tcrt County Hospital 



IN YOU* wn.1 



I BROWNHILL 

I Mr. E.*ock Brown, wfio has 
mud*: his homo with Mr. and Mrs. 
Ar.:os York, is very ilL Many of 



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WANTED 

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Atteitita 
TRUCKERS 



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TtWONTO, OKTAUO 

is ad worth one dollar with 
a load of 



Oak Ridges News 



Ratepayer** Fres^ May 

A special meeting of the execu- 
tive body of Oak Ridges and 
Lake Wilcox Ratepayers Associ- 
his friends and neighbors have at j on w ai be held on Tuesday 






SNOW PLOW 

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S ft fry 3 ft. 

Gttl Cfuftim 

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$65.00 
S. BREULS 

SUTTON - FHOXE 1MW 



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ouseg 

so much 



"Travelling by bus is a won- 
derful way lo see our country 
—the busy farms that border 
the highways, the rivers and 
lakes, thegrandeur of our hills 
and forests, fascinating close- 
ups of every town and city 

along your 



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been calling t:> see him- We of 
Brown Hill wish Mr. Brown a 
speedy recovery. Mrs. Bain* Mr. 
Brown's sister, has been at the 
York's to help take care of Mr. 
Brown since Christmas. 

Mr. and Mrs. Erickson and 
family have bought another farm. 
We will miss the Erickson's very 
much. The Erickson's have sold 
their farm here at Brown Hill to 
folks from Cedar Valley. 

Mrs. Michael Crissitti has been 
quite S1L 

Mr. and Mrs. Pat Turner have 
been visiting in Toronto for a few 
days. 

All of us here wish to welcome 
a boy from across the sea. His 
name is Dauno, and he will make 
his home with Mr. a«d Mrs. 
Erickson. We hope he will be 
ha pp y in his new* home. 

PINE ORCHARD 



evening, Jan. 8, in the Lake Com- 
munity Hall, for the purpose of 
considering the resignation of E. 
L. McCarron, president of the 
organization. Mr. McCarron has 
indicated his intention to with- 
draw, on his physician^ orders. 

The appointment of a secre- 
tary-treasurer will also be on the 
agenda. Richard Bull has been 
acting secretary since the recent 
resignation of James McNerty. 
It is important that all executive 
members attend this meeting, 
vice president D. fi. Cook states. 

New Year's Eve ushered in the 
new leap year, as many homes 
were the scenes of parties. At 
Ridge Inn the Revellers Club of 
Aurora held an evening for 50 
persons who dined an<L danced 
in party style. Captam R C 
and Mrs. Hawman entertained 
friends, and Ridge Inn gave din* 
ner on New Year's for 50. 
Extra Room for Lake School 




Mr. and Mrs. Walter Johnston 
and Earl, Mr. and Mrs. H. Eve- 
leigh and family of Aurora, spent 

Christmas with Mr. and Mrs. R. 

Chapman. 

A miscellaneous shower and 
presentation was held in honor 
of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Shrop- 
shire, at the home of Mr. and 
Mrs. Wilbur Shropshire, on Wed- 
nesday evening, Dec. 19. 

Congratulations to Mr. and 
Mrs. Delbert Dike on the birth 
of a son, Howard Noel, on Christ- 
mas day. 

Mr. and Mrs. Fred Leach and 
John of Newmarket spent Christ- 
mas at the Armitage home. 

Mrs. Albert Lloyd and Mrs. G. 
P. Wood were Christmas guests 
of Mr. and Mrs. Leslie Harper. 

Mrs. W. Reid, Miss Helen Reid, 
Messrs. S. Gibney and M. Bagg 
spent New Year's day with Mr. 
and Mrs. Harvey Gibney and 
family. Holt 

Union Church Sunday School 
will meet at 130 p.m. on Sunday, 
Jan. 6. Divine worship service at 
250 p-m. Rev. A. E. Doggett, the 
pastor, will be in charge. A good 
attendance to commence the new 
year is hoped for. 

In spite of inclement weather, 
there was a good attendance at 
the school concert on Friday 
evening, Dec. 21. Teachers and 
pupils are to be congratulated on 
the splendid program. 

Miss Betty Pegg spent Chrfc 
mas holidays at her r**" 
Sharon, and Miss *" 
her home in *■* 



A fifth classroom was opened 
at Lake Wilcox school this week. 
The teachers' office and about 

seven feet off the adjoining room 
will provide for 24 or more seats 
for grades seven and eight. 



spent Christmas and New Year's 

at the home of their daughter, 
Mrs. Clarke Archibald, of King. 
They remained throughout the 
week. 

We have received a post card 
from Mr. and Mrs. A. E. Fatchell, 
who, with their two boys, are 
holidaying in Florida. They 
were staying at Daytona Beach 
during the week of December 2?, 
and were then moving toward 
Miami on the following Satur- 
day. They reported nice weather, 
good sea bathing and fishing. 

New Year's was celebrated at 
the home of Mr. and Mrs. Jack 
Blyth, who entertained the lat- 
ter's mother, Mrs. G- Gould, and 
Mrs. Biyth's three brothers of 
Cedar Brae, her sister, Mrs. Ray 
and her husband, a sister, Mrs. 
Sedore and husband, Louis Se- 
dore of Sharon, also Mr. and Mrs. 
Bob Riehward of Oak Ridges. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Ashby and 
children spent Christmas day 
with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
D. E. Cook and for New Year's 
the Cooks were joined by their 
sons, Harold and Lloyd of To- 
! ronto and Edward of Oak Ridges 
and families. Mrs. Ashby's 

young daughter, Deborah, - has 

chickenpox. 

An important meeting of the 

executive committee of Oak 

Ridges and Lake Wilcox Rate- 



Farm Forum 
News 



We are pleased to print re- 
ports of loeal farm forums, but 
they should be sent as soon as 
possible to enswe early pttb- 



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Miss Mildred Dike of Toronto i 
spent the weekend at the v * • 
of her brother, Mr. P" 

Mr. and M 



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Miss 

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Mr 
Place 

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Farm Forums in the distrin* 
have not been meeting regu 1 
over the Christmas-Nev- 
holiday, but most 
J gather again nex* 
January 7. .^ 

Since Farm Fo - ? 
gan, regular repoi 
received from T; 
Holt, Kettleby " i 
market Ep- \. 
hope to 
all o' 
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^-est at 
Dr. G. W. 



Group of the 
HI hold their 
.ie parsonage on 
.veiling at B o'clock. ,. 

sobers are requested to be * 
-^nt as it is election of of* 



.-i.nl New 
.^i at the home 
1 Mrs. F. G. Draper. 
^my nice comments on their 
Christmas music have been re- 
ceived by the choir of the United 
church. Their leader is Mr. Geo. 
Ptice. 

The annual school meeting w»" 
held on Wednesday *"" =. 
the school hou c " 



i -. . iciing 
-■; -idtlon, Unl- 
rii v-.u be held at the 
.4 Mr*. K R. Fry on ThuW- 
aay, Jan. 10. at 2,30 p.m. Lunch 
committee; Mrs. Allan Case, »^f . 
Alan ShaWj and Mrs. Donaldsoi 
All the ladies are welcome. 

Mr. and Mra. E. R. Donaldson 
spent the Christmas holiday Wit£ . 
their son and family 
Mr. and Mr»; 

IAnna a^"* 



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ly at O** m 

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cers. 

Mrs. S. Cai" 
at Su« 4 

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taught by the principal, Mrs-ip^-g^ Association will be held 
Gladys Cross. Contractor D. E.J on Tuesday evening, Jan. 8, in 
Cook moved back a wall to make |^ e j^ake community hall. 

Mrs. George Gourlay and her 
brother-in-law, Mr. Claud Mar- 
shall, motored to Long Island, N. 
Y„ during the weekend, with the 
intention of bringing Mr. and 
Mrs. John Baggs to this district 
to spend New Year's with their 
daughters, Mrs. Gourlay and 
Mrs. Marshall. The parents, liv- 
ing in Newfoundland, arrived at 
the home of their daughter, Mrs- 
Berkley Nosworthy, in Long Is- 
land, in November. When Mr. 



the accommodation. Under this 
arrangement the five teachers 
will each have separate class- 
rooms. 

The water system was ready 
this week. A deep well recently 
completed will give an ample 
supply of water. Ratepayers of 
S. S. No. 13 were informed at 
the annual meeting, Dec. 26, that i 
a figure less than $50,000 has met 
the expenditures of building the 



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sn Fuidv 

-txpress. De - _ uis- 

c m \s are appreciated, so the 

v. ..ous groups can find out 

where they agree and disagree. 

Fine Orchard forum will meet 
at the home of Mr. and Mrs. A. 
Berg on Monday evening, Jan. 7. 

An important broadcast will 
be heard on January 14, when 
forums will discuss the question, 

"is There Enough Farm Credit?'* 
Best wishes to all forums for 
a successful year in 1952. 

Farm Forum Editor, 



.Uoy viflit- 
..Aiteheirs mother, 



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new school. One of the impor- » ^ fo he wouM , ike 

tant factors in financing school ^ Iebrate his goth birthday, 
business is regular attendance oi 
pupils as the amount of the grant 
given by the department of edu- 
cation is based on attendance. 

Mr. George Gourlay, elected 
trustee on the Lake school board 
for a term of three years, has 
three children enrolled, Ronald 
aged 11, and twin boys, Bobby 
and Georgie, 9 years old on New 
Year's day. Mr. A. E. Patchell, 
board chairman, and Fred Lynn 
have children attending 



which fell on Tuesday, Jan. 1, 
with his twin grandchildren, 
Georgie and Bobbie Gourlay, 
aged nine on the same day, Mr. 
Marshall and Mrs. Gourlay de- 
cided to make the trip. Thev 
left Oak Ridges on Frirf— • 
midnight However 
illness of Mr* " • 
and Mrs 
mai- 



SNOWBALL 

Mr. and Mrs. Ed. Robson and 
family of King were holiday 
guests of their daughter and 
family, Mr. and Mrs. Aubrey 
Wood. 

Mr. and Mrs. Owen Barr and 
family, also Mr. Albert Barr, 
were guests of Mr. and Mrs. N. 
Purvis, Canning foil. 

Christmas dinner guests at the 
home of Mr. and Mrs. H. Patrick 
were Mr. and Mrs. Russell T 
ren and family of OriJ 1 " ^ 
Emma Farren, Mr" 
Bruce Judge, v 
Weedon 
Pa**:* - 



Dr. Jas. Hamilton of Geneva, 
N.Y., spent the holidays with his 

mother, Mrs. Crowle. Miss 
Gladys Karl was also a visitor 

for Christmas. 

Next Sunday will be Holy 
Communion at the United 
church at the morning service. 

Our town has had such lovely 
decorations on streets and in the 
store windows; also the homes 
have shared their lighted trees 

with those outside. - 

Remember the community 
party in the hall on Tuesday 
evening, Jan. 8, with proceeds 
going to Sick Children's hospital, 
and sponsored by the Women's 
Institute. 



., datis- 
^^o. Walsh was 
u delegate to the Ontario 
^uucational Convention held in 
Toronto Easter-week and it was 
decided to hold a rate-payers' 
meeting immediately after this to 
have the report. 

Reg Wilbee was the retiring 
trustee and Geo. Smith was the 
newly elected board member for 
three years with Dr. W. S. Car- 
ruthers and Mr. Jos. Harrison. 
The school is an old building but 
still kept in very good condi- 
tion and up to date. 



■a v .- -^ uartshore 

..uarey spent Christmas 
-mix Mr. and Mrs. Percy Deavitt 
in Toronto. 

.The Misses Violet and Evelyn 
McDonald of Toronto, and Mr* 
J. McDonald of Orillia, spent the 
Christmas holiday with their 
uncle, Mr. Charles Wright. 

Mr. and Mrs. Dan Gill, Janet 
and Graham, visited Mr. and Mrs, 
John Henderson at Dixie on Sun- 
day. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jack Vernon and 
Dawn are visiting Mr. and Mrs. 

Carl Vernon. 

Mra. Ethel Evans is spending a 

couple of weeks in London with 
her son, Jack Evans, 




i' - 



■ ■ 



* .: 



ZEPHYR 

Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd Profit en- 
tertained a number of Lloyd's 
fellow workmen and their wives [ 
to a fowl supper on Saturdav 1 

evening. 

Mrs. Thos. Cain wr 
Newmarket K*v; 

lay. W** ' -v- 

*fliSJ£" .. '-■■ ^ 

; t ."ice was 

i;d church on 

•_.:*iitiie. The service 

..iducted by Rev. M>- 



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wish to thank their customers 



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patronage in 1951. We want J .4<w yfi$ 
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Mr. and Mrs 



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The W -ild held their 

December -cling at the home 
of Mrs. Claud'. Yorke. There 
was also the election of officers 
for the coriiing year, with Rev. 
G. Killen in the chair: pres., Mrs. 
J. Leaney; vice-pres^ Mrs. Ever- 



etle Yorke; sec^ Mrs. Claude Kai'anagh and Anne. 



,.iif Burkholder spent 
-*-al days in Toronto over the 
noliday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Kayanagh 
entertained their family on 
Christmas day: Mr. and Mrs. Ro- 
ger Hanson {nee Pat Donnell), 
Mr. and Mrs. Cam. Johnson and 
Wendy, Mr. and Mrs. Bill Kava- 
nagh, all of Toronto; Mrs. Ruth 
Donnell, Bill and Linda of New- 
market, and Mr. and Mrs. Jack 



Yorke; treas^ Mrs. Bernard Da- 
vidson. 

Sorry to hear that Mrs. Leaney 
is sick; we hope for a speedy 

recovery- 
School bells are ringing again. 
January thaw came early, and 

many were glad to see the snow 

settled. 
Mr. and Mrs. Ross Stiles and 



Mr. Herb. Kershaw attended 
his uncle's funeral in Owen 
Sound on Thursday. 

At the annual school meeting 
on Wednesday morning, Mr. 
Leonard was appointed as the 
new trustee. The present board 
is Mr. Art Alexander, Mrs. Fred 
Dew and Mr. L. Wellman. Mr. 
R. Strasler is secretary-treas- 



family spent New Year's in New- *g R & ^ ^ mm ^ schoo1> 



market with their son, Gordon, 
and family. 

Mr. Geo. Stiles and Ray spent 
the holidays with Mr. and Mrs. 
Bernard Davidson. 

Mr. and Mrs. Kobt. Davidson 
and John had New Year's dinner] t ^" a t the school 



wilh Mr. and Mrs. WilJard Cry- 
dcrman at Qucensville. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Moulds were 

in Newmarket last Tuesday as- 
sisting her sister, Mrs. Bruce 
Graham, who has moved to Tor- 
onto. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bernard David- 
son spent last Thursday in Tor- 
onto at the home of Mr. Martin 
Stiles, visiting Mrs. Stiles, who 
had the misfortune to fall, break- 
ing her shoulder. 

Mrs. Everett Yorke is with Mrs. 
Stiles. 



the trustees are Messrs. P. James, 
R. Sennctt and E. Burgess, with 

Mr. M. Batt secretary- treasurer. 

A special school meeting of 

the ratepayers of S. S. No. 2. 

East Gwillimbury, is being call- 
on Saturday, 



Jan. 12, 1952, at 2 pan. This is 
to transact business to make 
necessary improvements in the 
school property. . 

Mrs. Clarence Spencer and 
children of Toronto spent 10 
days with her parents, Mr. and 

Mrs. C. Wright 
Miss Mary Marsh of Toronto 

spent her holidays with Mr. and 

Mrs. J. B. Aylward. 

Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Doane 
spent New Year's with Mr. and 
Mrs. Ralph Doane of Toronto. 

Plan to attend the euchre in 
Queenvsille school on Friday 
night, Jan. 4, under the auspices 
of the Women's Institute. The 
draw for the institute quilt will 
be held at this euchre. 

The W. A. meeting will be held 
in the United church basement 
on Tuesday afternoon, Jan. 8. 
The supper hostesses are Mrs. 
Fred Weddel, Mrs. S. Eves, Mrs. 
R. Strasler, Mrs. H. Morton and 
Mrs. A. Alexander. 

The National Film Board will 
again be showing pictures at 
Hillside school on Wednesday 
night, Jan. 0, at 8 p.m. Everyone 
is cordially invited. 



roll were; Mr. and Mrs. James 
Palmer, Mr. and Mrs. Berg. Han- 
son, Pickering, Mr. and Mrs. 
Chas. Palmer, Dunbarton, and 
Mr. and Mrs. Donald Carroll, of 
London. 

Mr. and Mrs. N. Mitchel were 
dinner guests of Mrs. Mi tenet's 
brother and family, Mr. and Mrs. 
Len. Hall. 

Holiday guests of Mr. and Mrs. 
Lome Graham were; Mrs. Mary 
Cunningham and sons, Jack and 
Ross, of Toronto. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ed. Reddick 
visited relatives at Stayner over 
the holiday. 

Mrs. L. Glass of Richmond 
Hill spent several days with her 
sister, Mrs. C. Copson. 



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ird spent Sund* 

home of Missj 

int Albert,-'.- 

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Came at S»>** 




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ML • .... Murray has pur- 
chased the house formerly occu- 
pied by the late Mr. John Shaw. 

Mrs. John Shaw has taken up 
resider.ee at the Old People's 
Home in Whitby Mrs. Shaw is 
confined to a wheel chair as a re- 
sult of arthritis. 

The W. A. meeting of the 
United church was held at the 
home of Mrs. Gordo, i Rynard on 
Thursday. Christmas carols were 



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. r ..tyiiitfr Model, reg. $398 

I Deep Freeze, 121 cu. ft. capacity. 
reg. $699 



Sale $369 



Sale $599 



On Friday evening, relatives sung and the history of some of 



Belhaven News 



t. 



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route. On 
your next trip 
go by bos. 
-You'll enjoy 
the thrill of 




seeing so 

much.;* . 

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VANCOUVEH 


96.15 


CHICAGO 


MM 


WASHINGTON 26.30 


ST. LOUIS 


30.35 



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(Surcharge Included) 

Ticket* and InformaUoa at 

KING GEORGE HOTEL, 
NEWMARKET 

Phone 300 



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WILLOW BEACH 

Mr. and Mrs. W, M. Thompson 
and family are visiting Mrs- 
Thompson's family in Montreal 
for the Christmas season. 

Miss Margaret McEachern and 
"Mac" McEachern spent Christ- 
mas day with their sister* Mrs. 
A. Chapman. 

Mr. and Mrs. John McNeil 
spent Christmas with Mr. and 
Mrs. J. Mahoney and family. 

Airwoman Dorothy Draper 
and two girl friends spent 
Christmas with Mr. and Mrs. 

Clyde Draper. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hugh Rynard 
and baby spent Christmas with 
Mrs. Rynard's parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. Harlan Huntley. 

Mr. and Mrs. Carmen Marritt 
and Brian spent Christmas with 
Mr. and Mrs. Tib. Maritt of 
Ravenshoe. 

Mr. and Mrs. Don Magee and 
family spent the holiday season 
with Mr. and Mrs. Mie Sedore. 

Mrs. Violet Chapman spent 
Christmas with Mr. and Mrs. A, 
Chapman. 

Baseline S. S. No. 3 Christmas 
concert was a great success, with 
everyone having a good time. 

Mr. and Mrs. Murray Sinclair 
spent a few days at Willow 
Beach visiting friends. 

Mr. and Mrs. Mie Sedore and 
Mr. and Mrs. Leo Boag are leav- 
ing Thurrday, Jan. 3, for St. 
Petersburg, Florida. 



The play and concert under 

the direction of Mrs. Walsh, 
which was dated for Jan. 5 in the 

Belhaven hall, has been can- 
celled owing to winter condi- 
tions. 

The school Christinas concert 
had a good attendance. 

Christmas day guests of Mr. 
and Mrs. Ormsby Smith and 
family numbered 19. 

Mr. and Mrs. Elja Willoughby 
motored to Toronto on Christmas 
day and had dinner with their 
son, Norman Willoughby, and 

family. 

Very cold weather and an 
abundance of snow gave us a 
very white Christmas, but the 
snowplough kept the roads open, 
so the mail-driver and baker 
made their trios regularly. 

Mr. and Mrs. Sclby Fair- 
barn have spent a week with 
their daughter and her husband, 
Mr. and Mrs. W. Switzer, Ban- 
croft. 

Mr. and Mrs. Willard Cryder- 
man and Earle. Queensville, 
visited Mr. and Mrs. David 
Davidson on Friday, 

Miss Doris Willoughby spent 
the holiday with her sister, Mrs. 
Charles Whittaker. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Weddel 
had tea Sunday evening with 
Mr. and Mrs. Ramsay Weddel. 

Mr. Lloyd Pollard, Hamilton, 
called on his grandparents, Mr. 
and Mrs. Charles Pollard, on 
Sunday afternoon. 

Mr. and Mrs. Emery Willough- 
by spent Sunday with Mr. and 
Mrs. Skinner, Virginia. 

Mr. and Mrs. Norman King 
and Floyd spent Sunday evening 
with Mr. and Mrs. Alex fjopkins. 
Mount Pleasant. 

Miss Bernico Davidson attend- 
ed the alumni dance at the Nor- 
mal school on Thurfday evening. 

Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Smith 



called on Mr. and Mrs. Perry 

Fairbarn on Sunday. 

Miss Jean Whittaker, Toronto, 
was home over the holiday. 

Miss Lois Holborn spent the 
holidays with her grandmother, 
Mrs. Holborn, Keswick. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Mitchell 
and family, Severn Bridge, spent 
Monday with Mr. and Mrs. Nor- 
man Kay. t 

Mr. and Mrs. Norman King 
and Floyd visited Mr. and Mrs. 
George Smallcy and family, Mt. 
AlbcrVon Ncw Year's day. 



and friends of Miss Marie Morn- 
ing met at the schoolhouse to 
wish her and husband-lo-be, Mr. 
Lome James, a happy married 
life, also to shower them with 
many lovely and useful gifts. 
Marie and Lome are to be mar- 
ried on January 5. 

Lois Blum spent several days 
during the holidays visiting her 
god-parents, Mr. and Mrs. H. A. 
Brokenshire, Willowdale. 

Holiday guests at the home of 
Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Davidson 
were Mr. and Mrs. T. Evans of 
TorontOi 

Many from here attended the 
trousseau tea held at the home 
of Mr, and Mrs. Howard Morn- 
ing in honor of their daughter, 
Marie. 

On Monday aftc.oon. Miss 
Sandra Harding he'd a party for 
her pupils and their parents. 
The pupils supplied music by 
playing cello, piano and violin. 
Lunch was served. On leaving, 
each pupil received a present 
from their teacher. 



the carols was given by the pro- 
gram committee. 

Mr. and Mrs. Irving Lockie 
and family spent Christmas with 
Mr. and Mrs. Bert Lockie. 

The January meeting of the 
W.M.S. of the United church will 
be held at the parsonage onJiYed- 
nesday afternoon, Jan. 9, at 2.30. 
Rev. and Mrs. Thornloe welcome 
all the ladies to attend this first 
meeting of the year. A good pro- 
gram will be provided. 




KESWICK 

Rev. and Mrs. R. J. Serrick and 
family were New Year's guests 
of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Kennedy, 
Toronto, 

Mr. and Mrs. Roy PetUgrew 
and small daughter of Toronto, 
spent New Year's with Mrs. Pet- 
tigrew's mother, Mrs. O. Smith, 

The bay is frozen over and 
many fish houses are appearing 
on the lake. 

Mrs, and Miss Thayer of Jack- 
son's Point have purchased the 
corner cottage beside the Davies 
restaurant and have moved here. 



ANSNORVELD 

Rev. Moes of Bowmanvjlle and 
Rev. Brondsema of Toronto were 
guest preachers at the Christian 
Reformed church here on Sun- 
day. 

Mr. and Mrs. S. Fisher are 
spending a few days visiting 
friends in Hamilton. 

Harry Horlings is visiting Rev. 
and Mrs. J. VanderMeer in Coch- 
rane for a few days. 

Mr. Jncoh and Mr. Peter Uit- 
vlugt of Grand Rapids, Mich., 
are spending Christmas holidays 
at the home of their parents, Mr.' 
and Mrs. J. Uitvlugt. 



HOLT 

Carman Rose was elected trtis- 
lee of Holt school board for 
three years at a meeting of rate- 
payers here on Wednesday, Dec. 
26. He succeeds Ang>is Harri- 
son, who was a member for the 
past four terms. Other members 
of the board are Allan Hopkins 
and Ralph Cupplcs. 

The teacher, Mr. Dawson, and 
family, are spending the Christ- 
mas holidays in Toronto. 

Mr. Jack Couch, Chicago, 111., 
who has been spending the 
holidays at the home of his par- 
ents, Mr. and Mrs, Walter Couch, 
returned home. David Couch 
accompanied him for a week's 
visit in Chicago. 

Mr. and Mrs, Milton Gibney 
had a family gathering on 
Christmas; also Miss Phyllis 
Davidson spent Christmas week- 
end with the Gibney family. 

Mr. Chas. Galloway spent a 
few days last week with his sis- 
ter at Port .Perry. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Hicks and 
Betty Ann had dinner with Mr. 
and Mrs. Milton Gibney Satur- 
day evening. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wilber Hollidoy 
spent Christmas with Mr. Holli- 
day's parents at Brooklin. 

Mr. and Mra. Reg. Holton were 
Sunday visitors at the home of 
Mrs. Addie Hoover. 



jCOUI fWWS 

Boy Scout meeting will be held 
on Thursday, Jan. 10, at 7 p.m. 
New members are welcomed 
from 11 years and up. 





CM HOUSE 



POLLOCK MOTORS 

Keswick, Ontario 



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WEDNESDAY Evening 

JANUARY 



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. fit?* s. corner 

TtaanHSoUeaBA 

Aau*» OtBee: AiflSD Woe*, 
►?<»ta sad WeUfcujton Street* 
: Telephone 40t\ Auroni 

Joseph O. Dales, la. 



ACCOUNTANT 

k. k. CONLIN 
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1234- 



Offic* ud 
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190 Main St 



Cveni&fB By Ap pointment 

«. a. k. ia«, BJL 

Barrister, SoIkHo* 
Rotary Public, Ete. 

WON1 111 





Ik Story 





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This is the thirtieth instalment of a continuing 
Stor* of Sharon? from its founding to the present Ths 
storg was written after utmost two ***** of research 
and will, we believe, bo a major contribution, to know- 
ledge of the past. The remaining instalments wUl 
follow weststy. * 



MISCELLANEOUS 



M.ML 

MBtySt 
LOCAL 



iaa£fir3t£i 




MATHCws. snvn 

LYONS A VALE 
Barristers, Sohcttors 

Notaries 
N. I*- Mathews, K.C. 

K.ES. Stiver, BA. 

B- E. Lyons, B JL 
Joseph Valb 

mmfABKET OffKCE 
HABf ST. 



■ 



R. R. 2, Aurora Phone Kin* »r4 
(On Yosft St, 

Worth End Oak Ridfea) 

A.E.PIAWWHS 

Contractor For 

BULLBOZWG, GRABING 



and 



Flute 2!fw f Avm 



5 



A. tf . MILLS 



51 MAIN ST. 



Ml 



VIOLET 
KWNSON MacNAUGHTON 



kotaiy pwjc 

C on vey a ncing- - Insurance 
1 —afar* St. 



HUB I. OTTO* IJL 

TAftlUSIER, SOLICITOR, ETC 

35 MAIN ST„ 

PHONE W4, NEWMARKET 



STOUffWlf SAND 
riGMVB. 





pHrwm 
Delivered or at bin. 

" Plant phone 125 
Office phones 370 and 128 



House and Farm Wiring 

BO C Q BAIN 

General Repairs 
Ofl 



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Box 717 
Z5 Oaferta St W-. Xewauutat 



DENTAL 



DR. W. O- NOBLE 



mrnuxr al offkc 

Office 47 
Residence 1344 



-Av C. & VatufeWwH* 



JfemSt 



Newmartat 






— ^ 



MEDICAL 



S. J. BOYD. M.D. 

SM 




SIWAITBEAH 
MsSenfce 

RADIO PARTS, TUBES 
BATTERIES. ETC 

US Hals St 



A. STOTJFFER 
19 Raglan St 



Pianos Bought, Sold and Bested 
PHONE 270 



» 




J.Wal 



TOfG 



Dealer for 



a* ravTM ruvut 

Physician and Surgeon 
, -^^^I*eM 4*5 

1 At raa^enee corner of 
v lUgbm and Tecumseh St*. 



r.e 



ABKm&TALL 



Office: 121 Prospect St 
■ ■ w l f i rt i fcy Ajp i i a w M i ii 
TH-K*HOHE: Office 919 

Kewdence 12401 



OSTEOPATHY 



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WILSON 



CUafe 
JOIf BUILDING, BABBIE 

Telephone 2*93 
Consultation by Appointment 

L 'k JOHNSTON, D.O. 

j OSTEOPATHIC rHTSfCIAM 

1 Water St Newmarket 
Sours: Mon., & Fri t*5, 7-9 
5Vtd. 9*5 pjn. Sat 9-19 
relephones; Office 1157 Ne 
bet; res. King 55rH 




Humors of war were again be- 
ing heard and in October, 1SS9 B 
occmTed the first serious con- 
sideration of Canada sending 
troops to help the British in the 
South African trouble. At once 
Lieutenant Coloonel Lloyd of 
Newmarket offered the regi- 
ment York Bangers, which the 
Canadian government gladly ac- 
cepted. 

In January, 1901, the British 
government granted James Way- 
ling a commission to serve as 
an officer in the West African 
field force with headquarters in 
Nigeria, West Africa, and he 
joined the Second Battalion, 
Southern Nigeria, at Old Cala- 
bar; he served with this regi- 
ment until he was permanently 
invalided by a medical board in 
June, 1913. Several military ex- 
peditions were needed to put 

down native uprisings, and dur- 
ing his term of service lie was 

awarded the African General 
Service Medal and six bars; he 
was mentioned in despatches 
twice for services rendered, and 
received a letter of commenda- 
tion from 4be Secretary of State 
for the Colonies for service on 
the Ugweshi-TJku expedition, 
where he was wounded. Because 
of the fact he had been invalided 
he was unable to be taken on for 
overseas service during the first 
World War, which he very much 
regretted. 

In November, 1915, he was ap- 
pointed by the Militia Depart- 
ment temporarily to relieve 
Major R. R_ Barker as Inspector 
of Cadets for military district 
No. 2, and who was recruiting a 
battalion for overseas. This 
position Lieut Colonel Wayling 
occupied until Col. Barker's re- 
turn from overseas in December, 
1918. He was then appointed by 
the Toronto Board of Education 
as Assistant Supervisor of Cadet 
Training carried on by the city 
schools from 1920 to 1933, when 
training was discontinued owing 
to the government grant being 
cut off. 

He was then transferred to at- 
tendance department. Board of 
Education, in January, 1934, and 
retired in June, 1942, with the 
rank of lieutenant Colonel. In 
1912 James Wayling married 
Miss Hilda Strickland, daughter 
of Brig. Gen. Strickland of the 
India Corps. 

Another young man, Walsley 
Haines, son of Ebenezar and 
Mary <Doan) Haines, was born 
on a farm to the east of Sharon. 
He, with his parents, moved to 
Newmarket, where he attended 
school. When the South Afri- 
can War broke out, he enlisted 
with the Canadian Army for ser- 
vice abroad. 



While there he kept in touch 
with home by. very interesting 
letters which were published in 
the Newmarket Era. Walsley 
Haines died of enteric fever 
while on the march. By various 
means the citizens of Newmar- 
ket collected money and erected 
to his memory the dignified 
monument which stands at the 
foot of Main Street 

Wortt War t 

Canada was involved again in 

war in 1914. 

The names of those who en- 
listed from Sha r on which have 
been obtained are: G. W. Tans- 
ley, Gordon Ramsay, Harvey 
Ramsay, Charlie Story, Herbert 
Blackall. The second world war 
met with another response from 

the boys of Sharon. In the 
United church hangs a list of 
those who donned the King's 

uniform: George Atkinson, Mer- 

land Deavitt, Percy Deavitt, 
Jack Evans, Howard Fry, Ted 
Fife, Wilfred Oliver, Bruce E. 
Ramsay, Brock A. Ramsay, 
Lome E. Ramsay, Kenneth A. 
Shaw, Richard H. Shaw, Albert 
Selby, 3Lorna I. Weddel, David 
Weddel, Harry Moss, Donald 
Kitely, Harry Stokes, George H. 
Thomas, Arthur C. Thomas, Jim 
Fountain paid the supreme sac- 
rifice. 

Military Life 

I Additional activities of mili- 
tary life in Sharon make inter- 
esting reading. In 1869 Capt J. 
W. Selby trained the students of 
Newmarket Grammar School.. 

1871: At Camp Niagara, Pri- 
vate Terry of Sharon carried off 
battalion prize of $15 and also 
two badges. In an examination 
of officers 60 entered, but only 
16 passed: Capt J. W. Selby ob- 
tained first-class honors. Lieut 
James Wayling of the same com- 
pany obtained a second-class cer- 
tificate. The Newmarket Era 
expressed very special congratu- 
lations to Sharon.- 



JACK SMITH WRITES 



Ottawa Letter 



A weekly letter 




f«e Y< 



The session just concluded, which started out to 
be an uneventful one called for the main purpose of 
passing the Old Age Security Bill to provide for all at 
the age of 70, turned out to be quite busy and eventful. 

The most important business and for sure it will prevent an 

upward surge in prices. Some 
fears have been expressed that 




stUl was the Old Age Security 
legislation, but as weU there was 
the Resale Price Maintenance 
Bill, and other legislation of fax 
reaching importance. 

The Resale Price Maintenance 
Bill was introduced by the gov- 
ernment following an investiga- 
tion and report by the McQuax- 
rie Commission. This commis- 
sion, made up of able and experi- 
enced men and entirely inde- 
pendent of parliament, made a 
thorough investigation of the 
whole question of combine legis- 
lation, and as a result of their 
study and deliberations, recom- 
mended against the practice of 

the manufacturer fixing the re- 
tail selling price of his product. 

The bin adopted by parliament 
merely provides that there shall 
not be a system of price controls 
organized by private agreement, 
and enforced without responsi- 
bility to the government 

The McQuarrie Commission 

thought this was not a^good prac- 
tice and parliament agreed with 
that view in passing the legisla- 
tion; 

It is impossible for anyone to 
correctly estimate the result of 
this legislation- However, it is 
generally conceded that it will 

tend to reduce the cost of living 



■ 



OAK RIDGES 

Phone King 111 

Phone Aurora 46J 




■ 






JOHN E. JARVIS 

life 





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Goal. Coke. Wood 
and Stoker Coal 



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Orders taken for Gravel Sand 



3*"S£T5*r?s 



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and General Hauling 



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FSre, Automobile and Casualty 

*5 Eagle St Newmarket 

IlMIr 




INSURANCE 



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, BUBGLAKT, AUTO 
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JOHN DALT 



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31 Gorfcam St 



ALL WORK GUARANTEED 



r: CHSRC 'RACTiCj - 

CHIROPRACTIC 
ST., Newmarket 










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SptpmeP ,st 





Bill Mclntyro 

1 MAIN ST. 

NEWMARKET 
PHONE «tw 



INBVSANCK 



KXAL ESTATE 
LMlai* fcartted - dteaCa Wattta* 

AUBREY STEWART 

BE SUBE — INSURE 
JOHN ST. • BEADFOBX> 

147 



• D'ARCY MILLER 

St QOSHAM ST. - mCWMAUOff 



In February, 1871, John Terry 
died from injuries received when 
his horse became frightened. His 
funeral was largely attended; the 
temperance hall was too small, 
so the Children of Peace consid- 
erately allowed the use of their 
commodious town meeting 
house. Capt J. W. Selby noti- 
fied the Volunteers to parade at 
Holland Landing and at Sharon 
and attend the funeral. 

John Terry was another Sha- 
ron stand-by. He was active in 
politics on the liberal side; he 
was a strong supporter of the 
Sunday school, the Temperance 
I»dge and other benevolent en- 
terprizes. 

Although a sincere effort was 
made, a list of all the names of 
those from Sharon who had ac- 
tively engaged in the various 
military manoeuvres of the 19ih 
century could not be obtained. 
From enquiry at the Royal Mili- 
tary Institute in Toronto, and 
from Ottawa, it was learned 
that military records are not 
classified in districts, and in 
many cases home addresses of 
the men enlisting were not given. 

T ^ - 

KING RIDGE NEWS 

Mr. and Mrs. P. W. Ball spent 
Christmas Day with their son, 
Jim, and family. 

Mr. Hamer Ball of Ottawa is 
spending a few days holidaying 
with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
P. W. Ball. 

Mr. J. W. McLaughlin and Stan 
are spending the Christmas holi- 
days in Toronto with Mr. and 
Mrs. E. McLaughlin and family 

and Mr. and Mrs. L. McLaughlin 
and family. 

Mr. and Mrs. E. Turnbull spent 
Christmas Day with their daugh- 
ter, Minerva, and her family in 
Toronto. Mrs. Turnbull is slay- 
ing for a longer visit 



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MOUNT HSSAH 

The monthly meeting of the 
Mount Pisgah W.A. will be held 
at the home of Mrs. George Leary 
on Wednesday, Jan. 9. Mrs. R. 
Keffer will take the devotional. 
Mrs, C. Pattenden will provide 
the program and the hostess wiP. 
be Mrs. Leary. 

The annual school meetings 
were held last week in moat of 
the schools throughout the town- 
ship. At S.S. No. 6 Mr. Alvin 
Stephenson was returned for 
another three year term and 
along with Mrs. E. A. Smith and 
Mr. George I. Smith will look 
after that school's affaire. At 
S.S. m, 7 Mr, Harry Smith was 
returned and completes the three- 
some with Mr. Wm. Ash and Mr. 
Harold Doner. 



GIBBONS 
TRANSPORT 

LOCAL* LONG MRAKOB 
*WWO AND CANMK 

itniimt Simp 

nomiiaa niwmaur 



Hope Sunday school will be 
held In the Fourth school on 
Sunday, Jan. 6, at 2 p.m. Church 
service will be held in the Fourth 
school on Sunday, Jan. 6, at 3 
p.m. 

Hope W.A. will be held at the 
home of Mrs. Allen Balsdon on 
January 10. Hostesses; Mrs. Ce- 
cil Mbrtson, Mrs. Auley Brenair, 
Mrs. Steward Pegg. 

Mr. Bill Brenair, Muskoka, is 
spending Christmas holidays with 
his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Auley 
Brenair. 

Mr. Edgar Oberer, Kitchener; 
spent Christmas with Mr. and 
Mrs. Elmer Oberer. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry West, Bo- 
garttown, Mrs. Bert Dike and 
family. Pine Orchard, were 
guests of Mr. and Mrs. Archie 
Dike on Christmas. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold Broderick, 
Mount Albert, were guests of 
Mr. and Mrs. George Broderick 
on Christmas. 

Mr. and Mrs. Cecil Taylor, 
Donsview, Mr. Don Williams, 
Toronto, visited Mr. and Mrs. 
George Broderick on Sunday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Irvin Maries, 
Barbara, Holt, Mr. and Mrs. Mor- 
ley Moore, Port Hope, spent 
Christmas with Mr. and Mrs. 
Howard Pegg. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold Fair and 
family, Miss Ruth Pegg, Toronto, 
spent Christmas with Mrs. Dean 
Pegg and family. 

Mr. and Mrs. Vem Smith and 
family spent Christmas with Mr. 
and Mrs. Ambrose Traviss, Ux- 
bridge. 

Mr. and Mrs. Morris, and Mr. 
and Mrs. Jack Harmon, New- 
market, spent Christmas with 
Mr. and Mrs. William Gillham. 

Mr. and Mrs. Russel Pegg and 
Nancy spent Christmas with Mr. 
and Mrs. Ransom, Aurora. 

Mr. and Mrs. Elton Stickwood, 
Qucensville, had Christmas din- 
ner with Mr. and Mrs. Steward 
Stickwood. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ambrose Traviss, 
Mr. and Mrs. M. Traviss and 
family, Uxbridge, spent New 
Year's with Mr. and Mrs. Vera 
Smith. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jack Harmon, 
Aurora, spent New Year's with 
Mr. and Mrs. William Giilham. 



the legislation will be detrimen- 
tal to the small retailers. The 
government does not think such 
will be the case, and certainly 
has no wish to do any such 
thing. 

However, should abuses arise 
as a result of this legislation I 
can assure you the government 
will be ready to pass legislation 
dealing with such abuses. 

St. Lawrence Seaway 

Preparatory legislation was 

passed at this session dealing 

with that great national project, 
the St Lawrence Seaway. 

Canada is still hopeful of 
United States co-operation in this 
undertaking, but if this is riot 
forthcoming we will go ahead on 
our own. 

We need the power and we 

need the transportation and the 

whole development which is now 
assured will be one of the im- 
portant steps in Canada's pro- 
gress and future prosperity. 

Outlook Bright. 

There's probably no one in 
Canada who knows Canada's 
over-all business position better 
than Rt. Hon. C. D. Howe, min- 
ister of trade and commerce. 

This week he gave a very in- 
teresting review of general busi- 
ness conditions and declared that 
in his opinion the outlook for 
1952 is favorable. 

He pointed out that 1951 had 
been a year of record develop- 
ment and expansion and gave 
his forecast that it would be 
equally as good in 1952. 

The world situation still is 
serious but there is a more hope- 
ful feeling in regard to peace 
than existed a year ago. 

True we have many difficult 
problems, here at home and 
throughout a troubled and anxi- 
ous world, but basically Canada 
is in good shape and well able 
to take advantage of the oppor- 
tunities that lie ahead and to 

surmount any obstacles that may 
arise. 

As Canadians we have much 
for which to be truly thankful 
and we have every reason to 
have confidence that as a nation 
we are well equipped to meet 
every challenge of the future. 

With that confidence and in 
that spirit I extend to all readers 
of the Era and Express my best 
wishes for all good things and a 
year of peace in 1952. 



8" «nd 10" plate 



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B StylM at 






m ORCHARD CEMBCT BLOCK CO. 



;* 





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■ 



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0USERS 







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MADE-TO-MEASURE MEN'S SUITS 

ORDER YOUR NEW SPRING SUIT NOW 



-■ ■ 



539.75 , 

Extra Trottsm FREE .... You Save S1345 

REG. -$49.15 

Trousers FREE . . . . You Si w $1125 

* * \ * * 

REG. $59.75 

Trousers FREE . . . . You Save S1125 





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* * 




* 






Taibred to Measure 

CLOTHES 

Shop with Confidence at 

Yonr Store for Men's and Boys' Wear 

.The Clothing Centre for Newmarket, Aurora, Bradford 
- * and Surrounding Districts 

INSLEYS 




NEWMARKET, ONT. 



PHONE 290 



* 



* * 



A 



: 



■ 



KETTLEBY 

The January meeting of the 
Christ Church Ladies Guild will 
be held at the home of Mrs. R. 
Hunter on Tuesday, Jan. 8, at 
1,30 p.m. We hope all members 
will be present as this is the meet- 
»ing for election of officers. 

Congratulations to Mr. and 
Mrs. Fawcet Sr. on their golden 
wedding anniversary on Decem- 
ber 24. Their joy was marred by 
the fact that Mrs. Fawcet was 
in Newmarket hospital suffering 
from a broken hip, but we are 
very happy to know she is home 
again and getting on nicely. Her 
two daughters from the States 
came home for Christmas, so she 
had all her family with her. 

Services at Christ church next 
Sunday, Jan. 6, will he Sunday 

school 2 p.m. and evening ser- 
vice 3 p.m. 







- - - 




boss of 



your farm 
in'52 



j-iaa. 



- 



- ■ 



gm 5^15*8. 



FOR many a farmer the farm i$ 
„ boss v . it rstus blm, instead of 
him running it. Too many farmers 
underestimate the worth of their 
time; too few know what they are 
being paid for their work. 

Let the B of M help you make a 
fresh start in '52 ... so you'll know 
txartly what your farm is paying 
you ... and which operations are 
making or losing money for you. 
Your Bof M manager will gladly 
rive you a simple Farm Account 
Book that will help you txm rom 
fmm for maximum prop. Call or 
write for your copy. There is no 
obligation. 



And, when you've planned yom 
Farm Improvement Program for 
*52, you may find your BolM 
manager a handy man again — If 
you need extra money to make those 
go-ahead plans come true. 

Whether it's for installing more 
electricity or doing some other im- 
provement job suitable for winter- 
time . . . sowing more seed next 
spring . , . getting more machinery 
to speed the busy summer ... or 
arranging for more heat in the house 
next tall . . . you'll find your B of M 
manager the man to see. Have a 
confidential chat with him soon. 
Hell help you all he tan In '52. 



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Bank of Montreal 



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woritTng wltA Canodkot 
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Nswmrktt Braacbt DOUGLAS &XOWN, 
Aurora Braaca; ALBERT C WBIK, H 



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This display of leaves being arranged by 
Dorothy O'Reilly helped win for Sacred Heart 

School on the fifth of King top honors in the 

provincial forestry competitions. 



fit tribute to the hard work of the teacher, 1 



Sister Mary Fleurette, her pupils present her with 
flowers. After teaching at St. John's school In 



- 



Newmarket, she went to the Sacred Heart School 



in King as principal where she led her school to 
top award in the provincial forestry campaign. 



* *- 



■ ♦ ■ - ■ 



• ■ 



King City And District 

r 

MBS. LAIJEA KQUJNG, CORRESPONDENT, PHONE KING t 



Office Remodelled 

Remodelling of King telephone 

office should be completed with- 
in the next month. The room 
has been considerably enlarged, 
the extra space being acquired 

from Mrs, Badger, whose living 
room was converted to office 
purposes. The plumbing has 
been installed by Jas. J. Wall, 



Arthur Weliesley and Mrs. Bert 
Cadden. 

18 Schools Help Lesion 

With an average of $3.25 per 
pupil, Kinghorn school, S. S. 23, 
captured the silver cup and a 
$10 award in the poppy fund col- 
lection under the auspices of 
King Legion, 433, when 18 
schools in King and Vaughan 



Oak Ridges. The operators de- j townships raised approximately 
serve praise, as they have carried $350 under the chairmanship of 
on during daytime under pres- -. Comrade H. A. Phelps. He has 
sure of noise and dust while t congratulated this school and the 
builders are at work. teacher, Miss Evelyn Courtney, 

Mrs. Eleanor Scott will stay *$g %S2 ^ S?m ° • tr ° phy ** 
with her daughter in Torcnto for 19 * ' , Th ? U ™\ six winners were 
the winter months. During her schoo!s ,n K,n 6 township, and 



absence, Mr, aiyl Mrs. Bob Ben- 
son and their son, Clay, will live 
in her home, while their new 
home is being completed. They 
lived in the home of Mr. H. 
Evans for several months while 
the Evans family were away for 
a few months. 

Mrs. EUa Campbell, her daugh- 
ter, Mrs. V/esley Pressley, hus- 
band and children, were New 
Year's guests of her son, Alex E. 

and Mrs. Campbell. 

Carol Parker celebrated her 
seventh birthday on December 
23 and with her brother, Ron- 
ald, entertained Clayton McKay 
to dinner. Her grandparents, 
Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Folliott, 
were 46 years married on De- 
cember 27, and Mrs. Folliolt's 
birthday v/as on December 20. 

Miss Florence Folliott of Wes- 
ton and Mr. Ivan Jasper of To- 
ronto were supper visitors of the 
Folliott's on Christmas and on 
New Year's Day. Harold Fol- 
liott and his wife of Weston 
spent the day at the parental 
home in King. 

Mrs. Arthur Ferric of V/au^ 
bamick. Parry Sound district. 



cash prizes were donated by the 
Legion branch apart from the 
total sum turned over to the 
poppy fund. 

In order of merit were: S. S. 
12, Kettleby, $1.66 per pupil, 
prize $7.50; S. S. 4, Strange, $1.04 
per pupil, to win $5; S. S. 5, 
New Scotland school, 86c aver- 
age; S. S. 6, Jamieson school, 77c 
average; S. S. 21 Temperancevilie, 
70c average. The last three each 
won $2. 

Standings of other schools are 
as follows: S. S. 18, King Town- 
sip, 67% per pupil; S. S. 6, Maple 
school, 63.8%; S. S* 10, Bryson 
school, Vaughan, 63.6%; S. S. 2, 
King, 58*2; S. S. 5, Vaughan, 
4Z%; S. S. 8, Edgeley. Vaughan, 
33%; S. S. 11, King Township, 
24%; S. S. 7, Concord, Vaughan, 
233 S. S. 22, King Twp., 19%; 
S. S. 9, Glenville, King Twp., 
16%; S. S. 19, Nobleton, King 
Twp., U9, 

The district covered by King 
Legion in sections of King and 
Vaughan is approved by the On- 
tario Legion Command. 

School Sections Name Trustees 

At the annual meeting of 
ratepayers of S. S. 2, King school 



has been visiting her sisters, Mrs. section, when Laurance Scott 



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TUES., JAN. 8th— Presbyterian Church 



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REV, A. R. YIELDING 



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WED,, JAN 9th— Fr©§ Methodist Church 



BEV. A. S. OQGGETfv 






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THUKS., JAN. lOth^St Paufa Albican Church 

■ 

BEV. M. J, 



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FRL, JAN. 11th— Trinity United Church 

BEV, J. X RHODES 



* 



CHILD HEALTH CENTRE 



■ 



The WOMEN'S INSTITUTE LAKEVIEW Branch 
is sianjsorinjr a Child Health Centre for Infants and 
Preschool Children at: 

KESWICK United Church — 4th Thursday of each 
month from 1.30 to 4,00 p.m. 

ft Help K«j> Wc9 CUton HctHhy 



AH Are Welcome — A Community Servic 
in co-operation with the 



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■ 



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YMK COUNTY HEALTH UNIT 

* * 

First date for the centre - 21th January. 1952 



■ 



became the new trustee, a vote 
of thanks, moved by Mr. George 
Scott, seconded by Trustee Dr. 
H. J. Barrie, extended thanks to 
Arthur Peck, retiring after eight 
years in office. Mr. Scott also 
congratulated the trustees in 
maintaining minimum expendi- 
tures, with a bank balance 
amounting to more than §1,500 
over the 1950 balance. 

Mr. Peck expressed the hope 
that Laurance Scott would find 
his three-year term of office as 
pleasant as he had experienced. 
He also spoke of the fine co-op- 
eration of the trustees. Mr. Peck 
said the new trustee would find 
the school in "good shape". 
Trustee James Keens told the 
meeting that the expenditures 
required for re-building the 
school are below the $30,000 de- 
benture mark. 

Nine ratepayers were present 
at the meeting held in the school 
on December 26J 

Kinghorn, S. S. 23, re-elected 
Bob Riddel! for a three-year 
term. Alfred Busby and Harold 
HolHnshcad are also trustees. 
There are 21 pupils attending 
Kinghorn school. 

At S. S. 4, Strange, George 
Forester was elected new mem- 
ber of the trustee board, to re- 
place Leslie Glass, while Clyde 
Cairns and Ross Folliott will 
complete their terms. Strange 
school has an enrolment of 43 
students, with an average at- 
tendance of 42 percent in the 
past term. 

S. S. 22, Eversley school sec- 
tion, re-elected Leonard Shrop- 
shire for three years. Other 
members on the school board are 
Ivan Specht and C. C. Crosslcy. 

At Temperancevilie, S. S. 21, 
Mrs. Gordon Baldwin, a trustee 
for the past nine years, was re- 
elected for three more terms. 

Wilbert Jennings, chairman of 
the board, will complete his 17th 
year in 1952. Bert Palmer is 
the third member of the board. 
Mr.- Jennings, the secretary, re* 
ports t h at Temperancevilie 
school is given grade one rating 
by the school inspector. In 1951 
the aboard spent $1,000 to re- 
' model the sanitary system. 
\ There are 42 attending the 
school, while at present there are 
about 28 children from 2 to 6 
years in the school section. 
Ratepayers forsee the possibility 
of needing an addition to the 
building sometime in the future. 
Masonic inatallatior, Jan. 8 

On Tuesday, Jan. 8, the in- 
stallation of officers of Robert- 
son Masonic Lodge will be held 
In King Masonic hall. Harry Mo 
Bride has been elected ruling 
master of the lodge for the com- 
ing year. Installation will be 
made by Mr. Wm. Holies of 
Nobleton. The organization has 
over 100 members. 
Kingcrafts January 9 

6n Wednesday, Jan. 0, an 
open meeting will l>e held by 
Kingcrafts Guild in King United 
church, when colored views, a 
travelogue across Canada, will 
be shown by Sir Ellsworth Fla- 
veile. Teencrafters* organiza- 
tion, the teenage group recently 
formed, will he present, and hus- 
bands of the adult members are 

cordially invited to be present. 

I*ndy Flaveile, the president, will 

preside. 

Legion Auxiliary Bingo Jan. & 

In King Masonic hall, Wednes- 
day, Jan. 9, the Ladies' Auxiliary 
of King Legion 438, will resume 
bingos for the coming year. 

Visitors of Mr. and Mrs. Frank 
GambriU on Christmas Day were 
Mr. and Ms. Tim Keswick, who 

flew from a lumber district, 100 
miles north of Kapuskasing; Mr. 
and Mrs. Win. Cudworth, their 
son Don and his wife; Mr. and 
Mrs. Wm. Reid, their daughters 
Joan and Mrs. Ken Broughton, 
and husband, Toronto. Mrs. 
Cudworth and Mrs. Rcld are the 
daughters of Mrs, GambriU. 
There were lti (or Christmas 
dinner, 

Mr. GambriU, mail carrier on 
rural route 3, has experienced 
one of the busiest Christmas sea- 
sons In over 30 years. He has 
170 hoxholdcrs on hh route, and 
the deep snow so early in the 
year made travelling very diffi- 
cult for htm and for carriers 
Cummins and O'Reilly. In most 
casos.it was necessary to leave 
their cars to deposit mall In the 



boxes. Mr. GambriU has the [ they passed through Burlington. 

The highway was so filled with 
snow it was four p.m. when they 
arrived, after leaving King at 



added responsibility of trans- 
posing the mail to and from the 

trains to the post office. On sev- 
eral nichis the train from the 
north arrived at King railway 
station at 11 p.m. 

Mr; Wilbert Barr and his 
friend, Don Anderson, of AU 
monte, were in King last week 
to drive a car back to Almonte, 
owned by Mrs. Gordon MacFar- 
lane, who is at home there with 
her mother, Mrs. Ross Barr, 
since the tragic death of her hus- 
band at King. Wilbert says his 
sister is planning to return to the 
nursing profession some time in 
the future. 

When Sheila Bell, five-year- 
old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. M. 
H. Bell, lost her "two front 
teeth" on Christmas day, she was 
happily rewarded by a kind elf. 
She put them under her pillow at 
night and in the morning she 
found some money under the 
same pillow. 

. When Mrs. W. Hi Denton 
leaves for a vacation in Ireland 
and southern Prance early this 
month, Mr. and Mrs. John Aird 
of Toronto will come to King to 
live in her home during her ab- 
sence. The Airds have recently 
spent several months in Europe. 

Entertains Toronto Choir 

Miss Dorothy Armstrong, choir 
leader and organist of First Av- 
enue Baptist church, Toronto, 
entertained the choir members at 
her home in King last Friday 
evening. Forty-five motored 
from the city for a very enjoy- 
able evening of music, games, 
and refreshments. Among the 
gathering was' Rev. B. F. Rice 
and his wife, the minister in 
charge of the Toronto church. 

For Christmas Mr. and Mrs. 
F. J. Armstrong and Dorothy 
held a family gathering, includ- 
ing Mr. and Mrs. Bud Armstrong 
of Toronto, Mr. and Mrs. George 
Armstrong and son, of Maple and 
Mr. and Mrs. Frank Armstrong 
and two children of Eversley. 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter Monkman 
of Strange held Christmas for 
the family. Present were Mr. 
and Mrs, Donald Gillies and fam- 
ily, Miss Mildred Gillies, Toronto, 
and Mr. Monkman, Sr., of King. 
Miss Mildred Gillie remained 
the week with her sister, Mrs. 
Monkman. Another sister. Miss 
Roberta Gillies of Nipigon, left 
Dec. 21 for Plato, Sask., to visit 
her brother Archie, who farms 
there. She holds an executive 
position with the telephone com- 
pany at Nipigon. 

Dr. and Mrs. J. T. Phair held 
New Year's Eve open house at 
their home. 

Mr. and Mrs. A. E. Kelley en- 
tertained the immediate family, 
and her brother, Dave Glass and 
family, on New Year's. Their 
reunion was held on Christmas 
day at the Glass home. On Box- 
ing Day, Mr. and Mrs. J, E. Burns 
of Erindalc were guests at the 
Kelley home. 

Children Have Fun at Kingswold 

The Christmas snow was surely 
the children's paradise this year. 
At Kings wold, where Mrs. Gage 
Love and her four sons of Tor- 
onto spent vacation in their ca- 
bin, the boys had no end of fun 
in the deep snow. On Saturday 
last, their grandmother, 2*ady 
Flaveile, and Mrs. Love enter- 
tained the boys' eight chums 
from Toronto. 

Mr. and Mrs. A. E. Jarvis, Pe- 
ter and Stephen, held a family 
Christmas party including Miss 
Mnrjorle and Miss Julia Jarvis, 
Miss Constance Crombie of Tor- 
onto, and Mrs. Jarvis' sister, 
Miss Kaylo Bird, Toronto, and 
Miss Isobel Bird of Barrie. 

At the home of Miss Annie Mc- 

Bride for Christmas and New 
Year's were Mr. and Mrs. jim 
Wilson, Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Thom- 
son and Billie, Mrs. Thomson, Sr., 
Toronto. Mr, and Mrs. Wilson 
r Pearl McBrlde) had returned 
from a three months' visit in 
England. 

On their way to* Niagara Falls 

for Christmas with their daugh- 
ter, Mrs. R. Kemp and husband, 
Mr.' and Mrs. Arthur Green had 

a difficult time, especially after 



noon 

Mr. and Mrs. Pearson Smeltzer 
entertained Mr. and Mrs. Les 
Glass and family, Mr. and Mrs. 
L. J. Glass, Mr. and Mrs. Aubrey 
Glass, Mr. and Mrs. Bob Glass, 
Mr. and Mrs. Howard Neill and 
Beverley of Eversley, Mr. Fer- 
gus Lawson and Mr. and Mrs. 
Scott Smeltzer. 

At the home of Mr. and Mrs. 
Jas. Hunter, Laskay, for Christ- 
mas, 29 were present. Their 
son-in-law and daughter, Mr. and 
Mrs. John Hill of Rydal Bank, 
Earle Scott and family, Mr. and 
Mrs. Lewis Hadwen, Don and 
Bruce Hadwen, Mr. and Mrs. 

Jim Watson and son Bob, of 

Vaughan. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lawrie Boys mo- 
tored to Thornbury to her people 
there, for the Christmas gather- 
ing. 

Mrs. M. Rice of Waterford, Mr. 
and Mrs. Arthur Specht, Toron- 
to, were Christmas dinner guests 
of Mr. and Mrs. Ivan Specht. 
Douglas Specht returned home 
with his grandmother, Mrs. Rice, 
for a few days, and Miss Barbara 
Specht spent a few days visiting 
a friend in Toronto during vaca- 
tion. 

\ A number of young people 
sang Christmas carols Christmas 
eve, receiving donations amount- 
ing to $21, which was used to 
brighten the festive season for 
two local families. Roger Rawl- 
ings led the group of 13. 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Aker, their 
daughter Fran and son Ken, Tor- 
onto, were Christmas visitors at 
the home of their daughter, Mrs. 
S. H. Candy. The Candy family 
spent New Year's in Toronto. 

Mr. and Mrs. Edwin Robson en- 
tertained 29 at New Year's din- 
ner. Guests were their children 
and grandchildren. 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Fleet and 
children of King, Mr. and Mrs. 
Allan Cuthbcrtson and children 
of B o w m a n v i 1 1 e, were New 
Year's guests of Mrs. Fleet's par- 
ents, Mr. and Mrs. Bert Wood, 
fourth line. Mrs. Cuthbcrtson is 
a niece of Mrs. Wood. 

Mr. Andrew McChire had 
Christmas dinner with his daugh- 
ter, Mrs. Alfred G i 1 1 h a m, at 
Strange, and in the evening they 
visited Mrs. Gillham. «r., and 
Mr. and Mrs. John fioutd. Mrs. 
Gillham, the mother, is feeling 
some !>etter and is remarkably 
alert for her advanced age. She 
enjoys the companionship of her 
family. Her daughters, Mrs, 
Wickett and Mrs. Martin of Tor- 
onto, called to see her before 
Christmas. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Belknap and 
children, and the mother, Mrs. I*. 
Djnnick, were part of a family 
gathering for Christmas da£ at 
the home of Mrs. Dinnick's son, 
Mr. W, Dinnick, Aurora. Mr. 
and Mrs. J. S. Dinnick, who are 
staying in Toronto for the winter 
months, were there with their 
children. Altogether, 27 formed 
the Christmas party. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Wuish of 
Vaughan are staying in the Ever- 
sly home of Mr. and Mrs. J. S. 
Dinnick while they are in Tor- 
onto. Mr. Walsh is employed at 
Eaton Halt Farm. 

Mr. Norman D. MacMurchy 
motored to New York City last 
week with Mr. David Wother- 
spoon, who attended a minis- 
terial conference there. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. II. Evans and 
small daughter, Mary, have re- 
turned to their homo from St. 
Joseph D'Alma, P.Q., after on 
absence of five months. Mr. 
Evans was with an aluminum 
firm there as geophysical expert, 
and returned there after Christ- 
mas again. He hopes. to be sta- 
tioned in the Toronto office dur- 
ing the winter months. Mr. and 
Mrs. Evans went to Noranda 
during the early part of their 
stay in Quebec. Later Mr. Evans 
went to British Columbia, and 
Mrs. Evans and Mary were at St. 
Stephen, Now Brunswick where 
she visited her family there. Mr. 
Evans' work takes him to many 
countries, and before coming to 



King they were in South Amer- 
ica. 

. ■ 

Delynda Paton, young daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. Del Paton of 
King, was brought home from the 
Hospital for Sick Children on 
Thursday of last week. The baby 
has been quite ill. 

Mr. and Mrs. Aubrey Wade, 
their son Norman, wife and two 
children spent Christmas at the 
home of Mr. and Mrs. Scott Bo- 
vair, second line. 

Miss Nancy Ball, St. Joseph's 
hospital, training school, had four 
days at Christmas with her par- 
ents, Mr. and Mrs. Jas. Ball, Ev- 
ersley. Miss Marie Ball, her sis- 
ter, clinical instructor at the same 
hospital, is on a week's holiday 
at her home. At the pre-Christ- 
mas Silver Tea given at the hos- 
pital,, when probationers enter- 
tained their mothers, Mrs. A. J* 
Gordon of King was among those 
present. Her daughter Thelma 
is in training there. Miss Marie 
Ball had the . honor of pouring 
tea at this annual event. 

Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Gordon and 
son Donald left King last Thurs- 
day, motoring to Clear Water, 
Florida, where they will remain 
for three months. They moved 
into their new home in the vil- 
lage early in December. 

Mrs. H. H. Whitney returned to 
her home at Atherley on Monday, 
after spending Christmas week 
with her mother, Mrs. G. H. 
Stone. Her daughter Frances 
was also here for a while. Mr. 
Whitney is principal of the con- 
tinuation school at Loving. 

QUEENSV1LLE 

Miss Hilda Andrews spent 
several days with Miss Marilyn 
Miller of Toronto. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Dew enter- 
tained the members of their 
family for New Year's. 

Mrs. Lapp and Donna of To- 
ronto and Mrs. Geo. Blanchard 
of Newmarket visited Mrs. P. 
Boag for several days. 

Rev. and Mrs. E. V. Warren 
and family spent New Year's 
with relatives in Gait. 

Mr. Edgar Rose of Toronto 
spent last week with his son-in- 
law and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. 
Morlcy Andrews. 

Mrs. Cecil Foster and grand- 
daughter of Brantford visited 
Messrs. Clayton and Lawrence 
Foster. 

Mr. and Mrs. Tommy Stick- 
wood and family of Newmarket 
visited Mr. and Mrs. E. Stick- 
wood on Tuesday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Clair Smith of 
Toronto were New Year's guests 
of Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Smith. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ken Davis and 
daughter of Toronto and Mr. and 
Mrs. J. Pinder spent New Year's 
with Mr. and Mrs. Meek of Sand- 
ford. 

Mr. and Mrs. A. Seitz spent 
Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. E. 
Seitz of Toronto, and New Year's 
with Mr. and Mrs. R. Stone of 
Newmarket. 




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Klemscott Conjuror 86E 

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Giving you the kind of telephone service you want U our job. 

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getting better. But at the same time, we bclterc there** more 

to good service than ju« technical efficiency and steady 

Improvement 

We th i nk you like telephone people to he friendly, pleasant 
and easy to get along with. You want to deal with someone 
who takes a real interest in your problems and who is willing 
to give you a little extra attention, 

Thai's the kind of service we want you to have. It make* 
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NEWMARKET . . . 

ATKINSON'S DRUG STORE 
BESTS DRUG STORE , 
CAMPBELL'S STATIONERY 
CHANDLER'S GROCERY 
FULSOM'S TOBACCO SHOP 
HOLMES' CORNER CUPBOARD 
JARVIS' CONFECTIONERY 
KING GEORGE HOTEL 
MYERS' CONFECTIONERY 



DAL-HAR GRILL 
HUDSON'S 

OAK RIDGES . . . 

MARSHALL'S GARAGE 



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HESS' DRUG STORE 
MORNING'S DRUG STORE 
WHITELAW'S STATIONERY 
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HOME DELIVERY— CALL 13S 



SCMOMBERG ... 

COOK'S DRUG STORK 

KING CITY ... / 

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WHAT THEY ARE SAYING 





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Year For The Royal 
Rotary R e w e atb cr s Children 

. We would like the contributors to "Messages From 
Aurora Churches", which we were privileged to publish 
in our Christmas issue of December 20, to know that 
what they had to say gave great pleasure and satis- 
faction to our readers. We know this from comments 
we have heard both directly and indirectly. 



Aurora News Page 

J. G. SINCLAIR, Editor 



PAGERVE 



■i i 



FRIDAY, THE FOURTH DAY OF JANUARY, NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FIFTY-TWO 



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INHERITANCE FROM 1 95 J 



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It is fitting that we thank sin- 
cerely the Rev. H. J. Howey, the 
Rev. Father Lynett, Envoy, Mrs. 
Morgan, the Rev. Dr. Mulligan, 
the Rev. A. R. Park and the Rev. 

K. 0. Whatmougb for their 

splendid messages of hope and 
courage and goodwill, and for 
the time they all so readily gave 
to the preparation of their mes- 
sages for our Christmas issue. 

We are sometimes apt to forget 
the purely voluntary work done 
by our clergy, and it is a pity 
that v/c sometimes do forget such 

unpaid invaluable labor. If we J 

may say so with great respect, 
Aurora has every reason to feel 
proud of its clergy. Their min- 
istrations do not end at the 
church door; they work hard in 
various fields of endeavour, 
cheerfully and helpfully, and 
through their character and abil- 
ity give substance and strength 
to our community. 

Especially to the clergy and 
the Christian churches in Aurora 
we offer our sincere best wishes 
for a happy and Drosperous New 
Year. 



!' 



Tokens of Kindliness 

We shall be sorry v/hen the 
Christmas Jrees disappear from 
the windov/s of the many homes 
in Aurora, where their brilliant 
coloring has lent beauty to the 
festive scenes. There have been 
more of these cheerful illumina- 
tions this year than has been the 
case for many years, and* they 
have proved** a ' feast- lor the eye. 

We/shall be sorry also when 
,!b9v4ay comes for the removal 
of the Christmas cards. It is ex- 
tremely pleasant to look around 
the room and see so much varied 
beauty displayed in these lovely 
missives of goodwill. The Christ- 
mas cards have been unusually 
beautiful this season. There has, 
it seems, been a preponderance 
of red and candles this year. 
Pictures of the old stage coach, 
and similar designs that were 
reminiscent of an age that is 
gone, appear to be giving place 
on our Christmas cards to more 
modern drawings. Pastoral and 
woodland scenes, appropriately 
clothed in winter snows have 
predominated among those that 
have come to our ov/n home. 

However, whatever design a 
Christmas card may possess it is 
a delightful thing to receive, and 
to send. There is happiness felt 
in the sending of a Christmas 
card as there is in, receiving it.: 
To receive it is to know that 
someone is thinking kindly of 
you. Such impulses of kindli- 
ness exhibit the true spirit of 
Christmas, which is our Chris- 
tian heritage. 

Saying It With Flowers 

Our own Christmas v/as made 
brighter because of the presence 
of some beautiful blooms that 
came from the Nisbet's Aurora 
Greenhouses. These were pink 



-' 



£■ Aurora Social 




■• 



Guests entertained at the home 
of Mr. and Mrs. W. A. M. Cody 
on New Year's eve included Mr. 
and Mrs. Stanley May, Mrs. J. 
H. Knowles, Miss Mary Walton, 
Mrs. B. Willis and Mrs. J. G. Sin- 
clair. 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Cook of 
Toronto visited with Mr. and 
Mrs. George Walker on Satur- 
day, December 29, at their home 
on Catehrine Ave. 

Mr. and Mrs. Reginald Sin- 
clair, Doan Hall, spent Christmas 
with friends at Barrie. 

Mr. and Mrs. George Walker, 

Catherine Ave., entertained the 
following guests on New Year's 
day: -Mr. and Mrs. Gerald Brady 
and family of Newmarket, and 
Mr. and Mrs. Victor Doner of 
Newmarket. 

Dr. N. G. Mndge and Mrs. 
Madge spent Christmas with 
relatives in Toronto, buj enter- 
tained at their home on Fleury 
Street over the New Year, 



* * 






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* 






Make It A Ifabitt 
Meet Your Friends At The 

O. D. HESS 

IJ>A. Drue Store 

(Two Graduate Pharmacists) 

Veaxe St*. Aurora Tel. 

Calls Tel, St 



New Year guests at the home 
of Mrs. Charles Webster includ- 
ed Dr. Marjorie Melntyre, Mrs. 
Dugald Melntyre,. Mr. Campbell 
Melntyre and Mr. and Mrs.- If. C, 
Steels and daughters. • 

Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Allen of 
Asndin, Ont., have been visiting 
with Mr. and Mrs. J. W^ Hudson, 
accompanied by their two sons, 
Bobbie and Roy. Mr. Allan is a 
member of the Slistid township 
council. 

Dr. and Mrs. P. J. Watson of 
Doan Hall have been spending 
the New Year holiday with rela- 
tives in I xi rid on, Ont. 

Mrs. Jessie Melntyre pf Ham- 
ilton, whose son Hugh reside^ on: 
Cousins' Drive, hos returned 
from an eight months' visit to 
her native town of Bowness, 
Scotland. Mrs; Melntyre came 
to Canada 40 years ago and in 
that tiriie has made 10 trips to 
the homeland. ■ 

Mr. and Mrs, J. B. K. Gorstang 

entertained a large number of 

friends on New Yeart eve at 
their home on Spruce St* 

Mrs. Ifptman entertained Mrs. 
Tom Smith and family of New* 
market at her home on Centre 
St- on Uqw Year's dajfc 

The many friends of Mrs. 
Peter Fobert will be glad to 
learn that she has now left St. 
John's Convalescent hospital at 
Newtonbrook and returned to 
I her home at Barrie. 






tote To The M* 



OF THE 







ow Club Orchestra 




Kvery Friday Niffct it t pat 

mwmm 

a 

ADMMMON M CENTS 



" 



and white carnations, and for- 
tunately they still survive in all 
their original loveliness, al- 
though they have now stood in 
water since Christmas eve. Their 
scent is disseminated throughout 
the living room especially so in 
the early morning. 

John Masefield wrote that he 
"must go down to the sea again." 
V/e must go down to the Nisbet 
greenhouses again, to see the 
summer blooms in wintertime- 
Royal Theatre Record 

We are happy to inform our 
readers that the Aurora Royal 
theatre, under the management 
of the popular Clifford Griffiths, 
has scored up a record in all de- 
partments in the year 1951. 
Some correspondence we saw 
some days ago, received from the 
management, v/as highly con- 
gratulatory of the splendid sup- 
port received by Mr. Griffiths 
from his increasing patrons, 
which gave his theatre an out- 
standing position among his hun- 
dred odd competitors. 

He certainly did bring some 
fine movies to Aurora in the past 
year, and the public appreciated 
such good presentations. We be- 
lieve that this present month 
will se« other fine movies in 
town and on this we shall hope 
to have more to say at an early 
date. 

Meantime, we congratulate 

Mr. Clifford Griffiths on his 

well-deserved scuccess during 
1951. 

Aurora Rotary Club 

It was* Children's Day at the 
Aurora Rotary club luncheon on 
Monday, Dec. 24, when members 
entertained the younger genera- 
tion, one of whom was only two 
years of age. 

Rotarian Lees Owram gave a 
fascinating talk on the subject of 
skiing and was thanked by Cadet 
Training Officer John D. Gilbert 
of the armoured corps at Camp 
Borden. Jon:. D., who is a son 
of: "ft he club's vice-president, 
spoke oil behalf of the children 
and made a witty reply. 

Members enjoyed the singing 
of many old airs and gave one 
rendition especially for the chil- 
dren entitled, "Wish You Happy 
New Year** 

Sesolts From An Ad* - 

A number of Newmarket 
homes are a little happier than 
they were a month ago as a re- 
suit of a small classified ad in- 
serted Jh the Era and Express by 
Mrs*' Holman of Centre street, 
Aurora. Mrs. Holman is a spe- 
cialist in the rearing of canaries 
and budgies and a number of her 
stock have now found fond 
homes in the old market town. 
Mrs. Holmes has proved that it 
pays to advertise— in the Era and 
Express of course. 

A VERY HAPPY NEW YEAIt 

to all our valued readers. 



SUCCESS IS PLEASANT 

The new year ahead of us resembles in some ways 
this white sheet of paper in the typewriter that stares 
us in the face. In time it will be filled up and we shall 
be able to review it. We can remember some things 
that have happened in the past. We know not what 

will happen in the future. 

- ■"-.:■•■ . . - : 

It is a good thing that we cannot see into the future. 
If we could look into the future life's interest would 
1*2 gone. We have to take time hour by hour and make 
the best of it. Ourselves, we have ceased from making 
new year resolutions./ Such resolutions arc often no 
more than emotiona' extravagances and consequently 

worthless. Better rot to make them. 

Leaving the f eneral for the particular, our own 
purpose in 1952 w* 11 be to improve in every way possible 
the newspaper v hich we serve. We have a duty to 
every reader who buys a copy of the Era and Express, 
and especially \o those readers in Aurora who buy it 
chiefly in orri/r to read Aurora News Pages. That 
duty is to steie the facts as we understand them. 

Our Aurora News Pagesj have become an integral 
part of the community of A ,rora. That fact is proven 
by the steady increase in I ;he sales of our paper in 
Aurora week by week du: jng the past few months, 
culminating in record $*U$j >X the close o&ttte old year. 
This is '?( course cxtremKy/ gratifying to us, but it 
also inc car 2 our sense o'| fluty tc 'pufc readers. ? 

Su jcff' & is a pleasanfe-r^ih^lo e Jne^enee.- Unless, 
howev iv it is based in things of rea value it does not 



Council Will Decide 




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^- — . * . 



-I 



overs 

The new 1952 council will have its own problems 
to deal with as the months go by. There will, however, 
be a number of problems carried over from its 1951 
predecessor that it will be called on to settle. Whether 
the new council likes it or not, it has inherited some 
stock that must be held on to or liquidated. Whether 
they keep the "stock" or dispose of it, hot everybody 

is going to be pleased. 

Let us have a look at some of tiotis baby. They were put 



desen y'^o last. There are many kinc \ of success, some 
trans At and others permanent. 



Yi 



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4 -.----•: 



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■ i 



REVIEWING OURSELVES 

It has been our business during the past year, as 
a newspaper writer, to review other people. Today, 
looking to the future, we propose to review ourself in 
our capacity as a public commentator and writer. 

IVfe do not live in the fool's paradise of thinking 
that everybody likes us. We know differently. But 
we shall not change our course in order to try and please 
everybody. There are quite a number of people whom 
we have no desire to please, and would not feel fluttered 
if we did so* 

When we sit down to write our purpose is to fulfil 
the injunction of "painting the thing as we see it". 
Now this is not as easy as it seems. For to "paint Ihe 
thing as one sees it" is to go right ahead and do that 
very thing — regardless. Regardless of what? For 
one thing, "regardless" of what is called "stepping on 
somebody's toes". One must take that risk if one is 
to write honestly. 

We have very definite views on the role of a weekly 
newspaper. It should, first of all, bring to its readers 
all the local news that matters. It should faithfully 
mirror community happenings of value. That we try 
and do in condensed fashion in our column "What They 
Are Saying" and in other kindred features. 

We don't happen to like a weekly newspaper with 
pieces of news scattered all over the place, like bits 
of fur lying around testifying to a cat fight. We like 
a weekly newspaper that has features regularly placed 
so that the reader knows where to look for them. We 
don't like a newspaper that looks as though it had been 
pieced together by an editor who had had a bad night- 
mare. 



•• i 



• 






PUBLICITY CREATES INTEREST 

During the past year we gave a large amount of 
our space oyer to town council business. We propose 
to follow the same course in 1052. This is as it should 
Iks, for town council business is the people's business. 
Only in a newspaper can the people learn what is being 
done nt council. Even the Mechanics' Hull could not 
house ail the voters if they wished to attend their council 
meetings. So they look to their newspaper for council 
news. 



\.« 



p ■ 



During 1951 we were often very critical of what 
was clone by the town council. Much that Was done 
we did not consider was in the liest interests of the 
citizens of Aurora, and we did not hesitate to say so. 
The citizens of Aurora showed, that they agreed with 
opinions expressed in Aurora News Pages when they 
went to the poll* IS! December 10fe fcti utMtftyee 
candidates whom wo reconimeiuledonU were defeated 
received roe or d support and achioved; cisrtaiiv woral 
victories, their 

candidates whom wo recommended to the electorate 
were very substantially elected. 



- -- _ 



■ *M 






All of which pro v os that publicity fc goal for 

council. %^^mmfM^0mi^^^^M »ucit 

m amo«#^^Qj{j}j<Jr^i^}t :*hal!i!ifei$ift three 

years more and more yptor«;toyoiattenaedinominaUons 
and rccor^Sthoir : <mte s. Without publicity public 
interest ^^fcifcp»||^fei|^s^(* 
Public-spirited representatives should bo grateful for 
an honest, democrat itt***; 'V v : " 

In 1952 it will be our purpose to continue in Aurora 
News Page to serve the citizens of Aurora to the be3t 
of our ability ; to give them the facte as we know them, 
and opinions without fear or favor. That has been 
our policy in the past and we are grateful to our many 
hundreds of Aurora readers for the loyal support they 
have given to our paper. 






_ * - T 



it before the new council takes 

office on Monday next, January 

7. Indeed, this month of January 

was mentioned by Mayor Bell 

in September of last year. He 

then said that the hydro com* 
missioners would stay on the 
job if the over-the-line wall and 
canopy were left until a new 

council took office in January 

1952. 

Well, the new council is now 
in office and the hydro wall, and 
the canopy, awaits their atten- 
tion. That is how it was Jett 
when "peace" was restored in 
the hydro debates of five and 
six months ago. That is one 
piece of hot-potato stock that the 
new council has inherited. Will 
they keep the stock or liquidate 
it? That is the question. 

llow Is It Explained? 

Before we pass in review; a 
few things that the new council 
has inherited, we would pause 
for a few moments to mention a 
matter that has puzzled many 
citizens. We refer to the mat- 
ter of Mr. George Baldwin's 
resignation as chairman of the 
hydro commission, which every- 
body believed would involve on 
election to appoint his successor. 

At the nomination meeting of 
November 30 Mr. Baldwin him- 
self was in a mental fog concern- 
ing his resignation, which he said 
had been accepted, and he didn't 
know if it had been rescinded. If 
it hadn't been rescinded lie was 
ready and willing to stand again 
for election; and his name duly 
appeared on the nomination 
board as candidate number 30. 

Mr. Baldwin did not, however, 
go to the field for election. It 
was announced (though not in 
this newspaper) that the town 
solicitor, Lome C. Lee, had rul- 
ed that Mr. Baldwin did not need 
to seek re-election. This has 
puzzled many people besides 
ourselves, and we suggest that 
it is due to the puzzled citizens 
that Mr. J.cc should avail him- 
self of the earliest council oppor- 
tunity of explaining the circum- 
stances which relieved Mr. Bald- 
win of seeking re-election. His 
resignation was not in doubt. 
But the circumstances of his re- 
lease from his self-admitted res- 
ignation are wrapt in mystery. 
This mystery Mr. Lee alone can 
dissolve. 

What's in a name? Mr. Stan- 
ley Baldwin, former Conserva- 
tive prime minister of Britain, 
was always lamenting that he 
couldn't get back* to his pfea and 
his farm because of his duty to 
the state. Nobody ever stopped 
him from resigning. Indeed, Mr. 
Churchill was ready and willing 
to. take over his job. But Mr. 
Baldwin wouldn't resign! 

Mr. George Baldwin did re- 
sign. But when he did resign he 
decided to stay on, even if he had 
to fight to stay on. It seems 

there's a tot 'in a name! Mr. 
l*e's legal Interpretation will be 
awaited with great interest. 

The Hydro Handover 

We Ihink that public opinion 
reflected Ilseif Impressively on 
certain major town issues hi t be 
elections 1 ©if December 10, when 

Councillors Coihott nnd Jones 
were returned nt the head of 
Hie poll* by record- breaking ma- 
jorities.. Both these men have 
taken a strong stand on iht> h$f 
dro building and ' the meters. 3pj1 
Coun#ll4% loties' ft* partftKitor 
has 0npo?ed «ie 3oWii# $jpfm 
MpjSWmA Into. tow> lie; tins 
aUo: strongly oppostHl tbe cofiv 
trnuonco ofplhnhihg board ex* 

mmm Thcfr hiitfb- : 'vofct ; lhtt\v*^ 

cd thai Aurora eitizens;fully^up- 
ported Councillors Corbelt and 
Jones. ■..' 

It cannot be denied that the 
hydro '.'bunging as it stands at 
present offends against the town 
huJIding by-laws. Are the town 
building by-laws to bo disregard- 
ed willy-nilly when a building Is 
put up by the town, while ordin- 
ary citizens are subject to penal- 
tiesiafctbey disregard the build- 
ing by-Jaws? 

In view of the strong position 
laken up by Deputy-reeve Mur- 
ray and Councillors Corbctt and 
Jones on the hydro building in 
the months of August and Sep- 
tember of last year, it will be in- 
teresting to watch develop- 
ments following the support giv- 
en them at tho December polls. 

Mrtei*. ZmIh By-Law, Rte, 

What will the new council de- 
cide about the meters? Into 
their Ian baa fallen this contan- 



in 



on a 

basis. 



12 months' experimental 



The new council will have to 
decide whether the meters bave 
to stay or go out Councillors 
Corbett and Jones are dead set 
against the meters. In fact, Mr. 
Jones made the meters an elec- 
tion issue; and the electors serv- 
ed up a dish of caviare consist- 
ing of 043 votes for the "Aurora 
Churchill." We shall not be 
surprised if Councillors Corbett 
and Jones take steps to have the 
"mechanical thieves" eliminated. 

A few things seem certain of 
relegation to the discard. Among 
them can be included the plan- 
ning board's zoning by-law. 
Long and weary hours were 
spent on its reading by the pre- 
vious council and nobody seem- 
ed any the wiser at the end of 
the grisly journey. We would 
say that the thing is now as de.» 1 
as a door-nail. All that needs to 
be added to it now is IU.P. • 

The same goes for further 
planning board consultative ex- 
penses. For two years we have 
campaigned for Ihe removal of 
these planning board expenses. 
which have come out of the 
pockets of the Aurora taxpayers. 
We don't think there will be any 
further budgeting for such ex- 
penses. 

It can be said with certainty, 
we believe, that the Aurora 
planning board. will in future be 
of n purely advisory character, 
subject to the will of eounc.il in 
everything that it undertakes. It 
seemed to us that under the for- 
mer council the planning board 
was running away with the con- 
trol of the town. Things ore 
definitely changed now. The 
council, not the planning board. 
will bo in control of town affairs. 
And that is how it should bo. 

Hydro building, meters, zoning 
by-law and constitution of the 
planning board. These are very 
much alive questions which con- 
front the early decisions of the 
new 1952 town council. 



JANUARY SALE 

Dresses at half price and 
less, some as low as $1.95. 

Coats, suits, flannel slacks, 
skirts and blouses also greutly 

reduced. 

As an added special —first 

quality nylons— regular $2.25 
and $1.95 reduced to 51.75- 
llmlled quantity only. 



■ ■ 



MID'S LUXES' WEAR 

Yonge St.. N. Phone 553 

AURORA 



♦ 



< 



BR ON TIAIKI 
PHONE 339 

NORTH END TAXI 

AURORA 

Look for the Caw 
With the Yellow Tops 



For Friendly, Personal Service 
Shop At 

JOHN MORNING'S 
DRUG STORE 

Yonge St. Aurora 

Telephone 3Ww 



STEW'S 

COFFEE SHOP 

Enjoy a F!rs!*€lfus Meal 
In Brliht Surroundlaiv 



Grilled Steak*. Chopa 

lfjunburcen To Choke 

All Types of Qnlek Lunches 

Friendly Cafe, Good Service 

OPEN DAILY I i jn. • 11 pjn. 
SATUR0AY8 « a jo. . 18 *«. 

NEAR STOPLIGHT 
WaUN&TON ST. 



'-■ 



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J. F. WILLIS, PhmB 

• Drartbt ( 

The Rexall Drug Store -News- 
agent - Tobacconist, etc. 

(Business Founded 1879) 

Yonge St, Aurora 

Telephone 21 



DANCE TO THE MUSIC 
of the 

Don Offices Orchestra 

EVERY SATURDAY NIGHT 
at the 

GRAYSTONES 
AURORA 



■ 



TRAVEL 

RfAff vatlenB 

Plane — Steamship 
Kail — Hateb 
No extra cost 

A.LLMa*ta 

PHONE 2S«W AUmOBA 



B. G. WHITELAW 

Stationery, Wallpapers, Select 
Range Of Greeting Cards, etc. 
Agent For Era Classified Ads 

13 Yonce St Aaron 

Telephone 1% 




GifotSAimMtr 



9 



^^ 



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AURORA 

CLIFFORD GRIFFITHS . MANAGE — TEL. 8 



FRIDAY - SATURDAY 



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JAM. 4 - 5 



iTIEKMRtJReFTHE 






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HUGO ROBKRT! 






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\ g£m MACDONaip CAREY- M ^sSMITH 

.» EDMi mum • VICTOR WIT 

•vrifa^kaimHa-MkftiiiitKu-hwkinutacia-iiM^ktawpuB 

Plus 'TONEY FUN FESTIVAL" In TecMcobr 

and Robin" Part 3, showing Frt. at 145 
and Saturday Matinee 2 p jl 



MONDAY • TUESDAY 



MM 



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Bfcirfr^' 



-THURSDAY 



JAN. MO 



jfiSirfr-J 



Off the screen 
for over a year 
ow you can see it 



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'L. 



HDWARO HUGHES 

prodiKiioa t 






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JANE 5 
RUSSELL 

. .'V. ii" 

JACK BUETfl 

•THOMAS Min.HKt ; -^^ | 



W-J *- WKO 



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ADULT ENTERTAINMENT 




^^^^^«*-^i*i 



v^V^* r i £. 7-r-"* ^w^ 



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C0MIN6 SOON 

IMartin and LewiB in "THAT'S MY BOY" Jan. \\-X 

jGrcRory PECK in "Capt, HORATIO HORNBLOWER' 

Jan. 14-1 

HE MUSICAL SHOW OP THE YEAR .... 

M.G.M'8 "SHOWBOAT' Jan. 21, 22, 



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HOOSi FOR SAU 



I 



— Four-room modern 
bungalow, four years old, recre- 
ation room in basement. Corner 
lot landscaped. Apply 1 Arthur 
St, Newmarket, *4w52 






■ 



PROfttTf WANTED 

acres of undeveloped land with 
good stream. Is there one corner 
of your farm you are not using? 
Please write to box 173, Terminal 
A* Toronto. c3wl 



4 UAL ESTATE FO* SALE 



For Rale— Medium size oil bur- 
ner. R»> -Thermo style, in excel- 
lent condition. Apply Bon Schro- 
der, Keswjcic- *lwl 



For sale — Complete butcher 
equipment, including walfc-In box, 
refrigerated counter, electric slic- 
er, grinder, Toledo counter scales, 

meat block, sausage filler, beam 
scales, trays, hooks, etc Apply 
Oak Ridges P.O. * clwl 



For sale — Princess Beth cook- 
stove, in excellent condition, com- 
plete with oil burners. Apply 25 
Andrew St, phone 385, Newmar- 
ket ..-_■ clwl 



I srPERINTENDENT WANTED 
I Wanted — A superintendent for 
i office furniture factory. Must have 
' thorough knowledge of all wood- 
working machinery and produc- 
tion; be able to direct employees, 
read blueprints and estimate. Do 
not apply unless you can meet the 
above qualifications. Best wages 
and bonus. >pply in person i or 
write for appointment to Maritime 
Furniture Products, LtdU Orange- 
ville, Ont, or phone 46 9. c2w 5/ 

USH> CARS F6R SALE 



WILLIAM HOLLAND 

Seal Estate. IS» C*Be*e St, 



For Mile — 6-room frame house, 
central location, 3-piece bath; in- 
sulated newly decorated, new roof, 
new oil space heater. Possession 
30 days. Full price $5,900. Cash 

E. 3. Wright, phone 709j, 13 Gor- 
hara St, Newmarket clwl 



Far aafe — At Holland Landing, 
■1^2 acre of land «rilh building 
12*x28*. partially insulated, double 

fkior, and 2,00u ft used lumber 
near Office Specialty factory. 

Price 51,000. M. Nellsen, Holland 
l-An&fng, phone Newmarket 299J4. 

clwl 



— Child's tube skates, 

size 12, $250. Phone €00w, New- 
market, or apply 105 Andrew St 

•Iwl 



20 per cent reduction off retail 
prices. 2 - 708 Fawcett space heat- 
ers, new. 1 - 768A Fawcett space 
heater, new, >i- Quebec coal heat- 
er, used. Phone 422, or apply 29 
Ontario St W., Newmarket 

»2wl 



■ t 



• 



FOR SALE OR RENT 



For aaK — Modern dinette suite, 
buffet, table, natural with red, 4 
chairs with red leather seats 
Nearly new. Murf selL Cheap. 
Apply Era and Express box 67. 

*lwl 



For sale— '33 Ford sedan, in good 
condition. Apply Don Schroder, 
Keswick. nwl 



r us ^. _»38 De Soto sedan, in 
good condition, 4,000 miles on new 
motor. Phone 767w, Newmarket 

clwl 



For sale — 1936 Ford coach, in 
good condition, $250. Apply 85 
Queen St E^ or phone 1004r, 
Newmarket cl wl 



For sale — 1950 Austin. Good 
condition. Extra heater. Low 
mileage. Phone evenings, New- 
market 997j. *lwl 



For sale — 



reaf — 5-room house 
near Vivian. Owner. Phone 67220 
Stouffyille, *lwl 



MORTGAGES 

Wut/4 — $4,000 first mortgage 
on first class commercial building. 
Will pay 6 percent 

Charles E. Boyd, 17 Main St, 
phone 533, Newmarket clwl 



ROOMS FOR RENT 



■ale— Baby's folding "Kosy 
Karry Krib", can be used in the 
home or in the motor car; light 
Weight, with Carrying handles, 
good condition, $10. Mrs. J. If. 
Evans, King City, phone King 
107r3. clwl 



For sale ^ Electric 4-burner 
range, heavy wiring, bungalow 
size. $50. Phone 1227, Newmar- 
ket. *lwl 



F«r reat— Comfortable selt-con- 
tained flat, electricity, continuous 
hotwater, car space. No children. 
Apply 8 Crescent Dr., Newmarket. 

*2wl 



10 APARTMENT fOR RENT 



For rent — 3-room apartment 
Ught, heat and continuous hot 

water supplied. Apply 8 Vonge St 
N.. Aurora. crlwl 



I2C GARAGE FOR RENT 



For real — Carage. EiectricHy. 
Immediate possession. Phone 788J, 
Newmarket. clv/1 



ROOM AND BOARD 



Room and board for gentleman. 
Apply 49 Prospect St, or phone 
2#3w, Newmarket # rlwl 

Hoom and board—Bright room 
with board. Phone lift, Newmar- 
ket. c2w* 



14 ROOMS WANTED 



Want*** to reat— 3 unfurnished 
rooms by reliable party. Central 
location, reasonable rent, conven- 
iences. Write Era and Express 

box 68, Clwl 



■ 



•-( 



15 BOARDERS WANTED 



sza 



Want**!— Boarder. Phone 858 or 
apply 35 Queen St W.,. Newmar- 
ket cr4w52 



16 APARTMENT WANTED 

Wantrd to rent—Small, heated, 
furnished apartment or furnished 
room, kitchen and lath, no child- 
ren. Central. Steve Tichotoff, 
phone 101, Newmarket. Mwl 



17 ARTICLES FOR SAl£ 



Cress Corn Salve for sure relief. 
Druggists sell Cress Bunion Salve 
—wear stylish shoes soon. *lwi 

For sale — Electric refrigerator; 
combination electric and coal 
stove; Beatty washing machine; 4 
linoleum rugs and studio couch. 
Phone 709w, Newmarket clwl 

For tale — Muskrat fur coat, 
worn one season, size 16-18. Miss 
McCaffrey, phone 400, Newmar- 
ket - v clwl 

Our pre-Cnristmas business was 
good! To the many who took ad- 
vantage of our wide selection and 
attractive prices we say, thank 
you. ft has long been our policy to 
offer quality merchandise at low- 
est possible prices, and v/e will 
continue to do so. Our heavy A. 
;F. melton pants for the outside 
worker are exceptional value at 
S6.95. Battle dress tunics, re-is^ue 
for $3.95. plaid doeskin shirts 
$2.98. Warm combination under- 
wear $2.99. Leather dress gloves, 
$2.95. Metal back clothes brushes 
special at 35c each, manicure scis- 
sors, social at 25c. We have sev- 
eral nearly, new suits and over- 
coats from $15.00 to $19.00. Don't 
miss looking over our stock of 
windbreakers, stroller coats, sta- 
tion v/agon coats, and bomber 
Jackets, wide selection and lowest 
prices anywhere. Drop in and 
browse around. 

Army Air force Stores, Aurora. 

clwl 



1949 Ford coach 
<maroon) with sun-visor, heater, 
slip covers, directional turning 
signals, automatic windshield wash- 
ers, new tire and new battery. 
Price $1,350. Phone 505 or 274, 
Newmarket clwl 



23 WORK WANTED 

UPHOLSTERING 

Chesterfield suites, occasional 
chairs, rebuilt, recovered In any 
fabric. Apply Ken Sargent, 85 
Corham St., or phone 382, New- 
market tfl 



27 



FARM ITEMS 



ATTENTION FARMERS 

6 old reliable. Anderson pipe 
line milker is still in the picture. 
lyow vacuum, low upkeep, and low 
price. Write for prices. J. Mighton 
734 Euclid Ave., Toronto. Phone 
KE. 7383. c3w51 



— Venetian blinds, alu- 
minum or vteel, mad* for all style* 
of window*. Free estimate* and 
but* Nations. Phone 755, *pply 
to Ontario St. W., or write P.O 
box 406, Newmarket. tfl 

r - - i - _ i , , -^ 

Zipper* re placed, alterations and 
repairs, invisible mending, relining, 
cleaning and pressing. Master 
Cleaner* and Tailors, 6 Timothy 
St. W., phone 1409, Newmarket. 

c4w30 



JANUARY HALF 
Ski hoots, reg. $12.50 for $5; ski 
caps, your pick for 93 cents; baby 
carriage sleigh runners, reg. $5.25 
for 8-1.25; bowling shoes, size 8 
and only, $3.33. Newmnrkei 
Sports and Cycle Shop, 25 Main 
St, phone 86Gm, Newmarket 

clwl 

WAI.I.KTH FOR MKN 
fjenulne feather, handsome alli- 
gator or Morocco Mack. I .oft from 
Xmas stock. Limited number only. 
S4. Phone 202wl or write J, O. 
Lewis, hox 31fi, Newmarket Mwl 

For sale — Kleclric motor, GO 
cycle, 1-4 h.p., hrnss mandrel with 
twin emery, wood lathe, small 
drill. Phone Queensvilte Olfi. 

clwl 

For *ale— Cookstove, white en- 
amel, small; jacket heater; sump- 
pump; kitchen cabinet, skis 6' 6"; 
auto knitting machine; tires 15x 
670, low pressure; 30x3 1-2 kitchen 
fable, enamel lop;; round bath- 
room sink with taps; child's C.C.M. 
Joycycle; child's Iron crib, drop 
sides; single bed; fatdawny bed 

wilh spring mattressj several rad- 
ios and odd cabinets. All kinds of 
chairs and tables, glassware, dish- 
es. Phone K. Hirst, Queensvllle 
lllfi, clwl 



For «ale— Surge milker, slight- 
ly used. Bargain for quick sale. 
Also a Hinman, used, priced right 
Apply John Mighton, 734 Euclid 
Ave., "Anderson Milker Sales" or 
phone Ken. 7383 evenings, Toronto. 

c2w52 

More milk at lower feed cost 
with Ful-O-Pep 24 percent! Bal- 
ance your home-grown grains with 
Ful-O-Pep. Help your cows get 
full value from grain and rough- 
age. Come In and sec us for Ful- 
O-Pep 24 percent Dairy Ration. 
Perks Feed Mill Ltd., phone 657, 
Newmarket. clwl 

For &ale — Set of team sleighs. 
Apply Phil Hamilton, Orchard 
Beach or phone Roche's Point 
178w. clwl 




or left at T*a.J&* 

7M; at Wfaita- 

lur-i, paim H, in Aorora; it Hn. L E. B«Qaif, paom 8, King; 
or with aaar cof wap efwlenf. AJvart lae aa eB ta acr ep C e d Uuroaah the 

of ~nd>r ^d addre. fa. clearly LndScated. 

geti Into ore? S^*» a*mea In North York. 




COUQH SYWJF 

For coughs, colds and bronchi- 
tis. A prompt and effective rem- 
edy for the relief of bronchitis, 
tight or chesty coughs and colds, 
75 cents. The Best Drug Store, 
Newmarket_ _ 

; 7 gtritJWJC OR RENT 

Hospital beds, wheel and Invalid 
chairs. Theaker and Son, Mount 
Albert, 3503. ^^ - _ trt 

\'~- HMCCOVS IS THROAT 

Thuna's Pink Tablets for the 
nose and throat, for the dropping 
of mucous discharge, sensation of 
the lump In the throat and other 
disturbances. These are the same 
reliable pink tablets that have been 
used for many years by adults and 
children with good results. Price 
$1.00; $1.75; $230. The Best Drug 
Store, phone 14, Newmarket. 

For rent—Record players, $2 a 
day. Delivery and pick-up charge 
50 cents. Budd Studios, phone 431, 
Newmarket- tf49 



* - 



URGENT 



Anyone knowing the where- 
about of Mrs. John Farrell, last 
seen at Riveredge, please phoie 



In 



<±* 




IJ. 1368, Toronto. 



clwl 



PIANO AND THEORY 

A.T.CM. GRADUATE 

Pupils prepared for Conservatory 
Exams. Will visit home. Phone 
Mrs. M. Scott, 185J14 or 11, New- 
market, for particulars. c3wl 



■ 



r 



PETS 



For safe — 2 puppies. Phone 
1409, Newmarket. clwl 



For sale— Part Spnniel puppies, 
black and white, male. $5. Apply 
Era and Express box 70. *lwl 



2t Livestock for sale 



I SALE REGISTER 



For sale — 2 nice young red 

Durham bulls, dual purpose. Phono 

A. McDonald, 80r24, Aurora. 

C2w52 

For sale— 12 pigs, 8 weeks old. 
Phone Geo. Vernon, 141wl2, New- 
market *lwl 

For aale— Holstefn heifer, due 
io freshen. Apply Floyd Hollinger, 
phone 1420 Mount Albert clwl 

For wile— 2 registered Jersey 
cows, both 3 years old, and due to 
freshen in the next two weeks. 
Herd fully accredited and calf vac- 
cinated. Stewart Bros, phone 
King 4r2. clwl 



2f A LIVESTOCK WANTED 



Wanted— Horses ror mink feed. 
Highest prices paid. Rex Smith, 
Queensvllle, phone 1912 collect 

*q 

Wanted to buy — Horses for 
mink. Will call for with truck, 
fiood cash prices paid. Frank 
Coleman, phone 1Q89J, Newmar- 
ket, or wrile P.O. box. 25. tfl 



Hut unlay, Jan. S— Auction sale 
at the Stouffville Livestock Sales 
Arena, selling livestock our spec- 
ially. Fresh cows, springers, heif- 
ers, sheep, calves, pigs and horses. 
Pick-up and delivery can be ar- 
ranged. This Is your community 
sale. Come early and bring some- 
thing to sell. You bring It and 
we'll sell It Sale every Saturday, 
at 1 p.m. Make this your market 
where buyers and sellers meet 
Sellers and Atkinson, auctioneers. 

tf45 

Thursday, Jw%, 17— Auction sale 
of 22 head of high grade Holsteln 
cattle, fresh cows, springers, nnd 
milkers; team of horses; 150 leg- 
horn hens, nt lot 6, con. 8, Whlt- 



.^— Treasured memor- 
ies of a dear grandson, Ronald 
Blackburn, who passed away Jan. 
5, 1946. 
We loved him, ah, no tongue can 

tell, 
How much we loved him and how 

well; 
God loved him, too, and thought It 

best. 
To take him home with him to 

rest. 

Fondly loved and deeply mourn- 
ed by Grandpa and Grandma 
Blackburn. 

Blackburn — In loving memory of 
our dear son and brother, Ronald 
Blackburn, who passed away Jan. 
5, 1046. 
Six years have passed and gone. 

Since one we loved so well; 
Was taken from our home on earth 

With Jesus Christ to dwell. 
The flowers we place upon his 
grave, 

May wither and decay; 
But the love for him who sleeps 
beneath 

Shall never fade away. 

Kver remembered by Mon, Dad, 
sisters nnd brothers. 

liar ma it— In loving memory of 
n dear father, Robert Arthur Hnr- 
mnn, who passed away Jan. 5, 1050. 
I watched you suffer, I heard you 

sigh, 
But all I could do was just stand 

by; 
And when the time came I suffer- 
ed too. 
For you never deserved what you 
went through. 

Sadly missed nnd always remem- 
tieied by son Lindsay, daughter- 
in-law Helen and granddaughter 
Mrs. Paul J. llouck. 

Ilarman— In loving memory .of ; 

our dear father and grandpa, Ar- 
thur Harm an, who passed awayj 

Jan. 5, 1950. '. 

Too far away for sight or speech, 

But nrit loo far.fop thought to 

reach, -ji '■■ . 

A loving father, Wnti: and true. 
No one on earth we'll Ilml llko 

yoU*- 

Daughter Mary, son-ln-lnw Ken, 
grandchildren Kenny nriii Judy; 

Molyneaux'— In loving mernory 
of a denrYat|^e^a!!l9'hus^n<]lk--d0h.n' 
Hamilton Molyneaux, AVhfi passed 
away Jan. 3; lK>i, 
Ills smiling way mid pleasant face 

Are a pleasure to recoil] 
He had a kindly word for eaclii 

And died heloved by tili; . 
Some day we hope to meet him, 

Some day, we know ^ hot y7iien; 
To clasp his hand in the better 
land. 

Never to part again. '' ■ 

Lovingly remembered by ._ Hie 
family. 



WRTHS I 

BartTeU— Mr. and Mrs. Len Bart* 
lett (Irene Heath) announce the 
birth of their daughter, Gayle 
Elizabeth, oh Monday, Dec. 24, 
1951, at the Strathcona Hospital. 

Brown— At York County hospi- 
tal, Friday, Dec. 28, 1951, to Mr. 
and Mrs. William Bro.wn, Holland 
Landing, a son. 

Difee— At York County hospital, 
Tuesday, Dec. 25, 1951, to Mr. and 
Mrs, Delbert Dike, Newmarket, a 
sonV 

Fletcher— At York County hos- 
pital, Saturday, Dec. 29, 1951, to 
Mr. and Mrs. Fred Fletcher, Rich- 
mond Hill, a daughter. 

Gibbons — At York County hos- 
pital, Sunday, Dec. 30, 1951, to Mr. 
and Mrs. Stanley Gibbons, New- 
market, a son, Paul Douglas. 

Leach— At St. Saviore hospital. 
Vol D*Or, Friday, Dec. 28, 1951, 
to Mr. and Mrs."Eric Leach, Grand 
Lac Victoria, P.Q., a son. Mr. 
Leach was formerly of Newmar- 

ket. 

Mclntyre — At Women's College 

hospital, Toronto, Monday, Dec. 31, 

1951, to Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Ogll- 
vSe Mclntyre, Aurora, a son. 

Morton— At York County hospi- 
tal, Saturday, Dec 29, 1951, to Mr. 
and Mrs. Milton Morton, Newmar- 
ket, a son. 

Powell— At York County hospi- 
tal, Tuesday, Jan. 1, 1952. to Mr. 
and Mrs. Ltoyd Powell, Newmar- 
ket, a daughter (still horn). 

Rose— At Burnslde Wing of the 
Toronto General hospital, Friday, 
Dec 14„ 1951, to Mr. and Mrs. 
Lorne Rose, Haviland, a son. 

Saunders — At York County hos- 
pital, Monday, Dee. 31, 1951, to 
Mr. and Mrs. Frank Saunders, 
Keswick, a daughter. 

Wilson— At York County hospi- 
tal, Monday, Dec. 31, 1951, to Mr. 
and Mrs. Thomas Wilson, King, a 
daughter. 



ife»j««Sia.;*..-. ■ 



:..r 10W COST HEARING 



• Rochester BEST j^xio ffioRi 

Phone 14 Newmarket 

U46 



Roadhouse & Rose 

FUNRAL DIRECTORS 

MAIN STREET NEWMARKET 

Strasler & Son 

QUEENSVILLE ,. 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS AND 
AMBULANCE SERVICE 

phones zm - un 



PERRINS 

Flower Shop 



parte 



Member Florists Tt lemyfc 

Delivery AssocUtioa 

Flowers wired to all 
of the world. 

FUNERAL FLOWERS 
a sncni/rr 

lis Blala St 

. none M5W 






McCaffreys 

Flowers 

FOR BVERY OCCASION 

Flowers Tetecnyoed 
AH Over the WortA 

6 MAIN STREET 

Plione 573J 

NEWMARKET 



♦ 



" 




clerk, A S* Farmer, nuci!on<*i!r. 

«2w! 



■ * 









Vour old fur coat oan look like 
new If you have It repaired and re- 
Styled. Highest prices on your old 
coats. Our new coals are very 
low In price. By appointment we 
will come to your own home end 
you can select your own furs and 
style. Master Furriers and Tailors, 
6 Timothy St. W. f phone 1403, 
Newmarket. c4w50 

RKCKgHKfft RATirrtms Mfl 

fimart Martha Washington nnd 
Rlchtedfff* statnlesH 3-plece hatlj- 
room sets, white $160 to $18*1; 
colored $274 complete with beau- 
tiful chromed fittings. Air condi- 
tioning furnaces $295. Special of- 
fers to plumbers nnd builders too. 
Save mr.ny valunhle dollars, buy 
with confidence and have a nicer 
home. Satisfaction guaranteed. 
Extra discounts off catalogue pric- 
es If we supply everything you 
need for complete plumhlng or 
heating Installation. Catalogue in- 
cludes llttin photos of main fix- 
lures, prices nnd installation dia- 
grams. Select style of sinks, cab- 
inets, laundry tubs, showers, 
stoves, refrigerators. Pressure 
water systems, oil burners, septfe 
and oil tanks, eic. Visit or wrile 
Johnson Mail Order Division, 
StreelsvHle Hardware, BtreetsviUo, 
Out Phone 261; evenings SlRlft. 

clwl 



for sale — ■ Piano. Apply New- 
market Dairy.* elwl 



PRODUCE 



Vat sain — Potatoes, wholesale. 

Phone Mount Albert 75!«1. U35 



178 MERCHANDISE 



TUOft WA815EK * OMOIRflN 

Eiecric 5S and 60 cycle, gas 
washers, repair parts and service. 
Stewart Beare, Radio and Applian- 
ces, 113 Main St., phone 35a, New- 
market. *fl 



Vor sate— Hearing a!d batteries 

for moat popular makes. Stewart 
Beare, Radio and Appliance, 113 
Main St., phone 355, Newmarket, 

1 1 * 



For sale— Holsteln cow, 5 years 
old, due to freshen Jan. lfi. Apply 
O, J. Peters, Keswlek, or phone 
1317 Queensvilte. clwl 



79 POULTRY FOR SALE 

For sale -— 20 Plymouth Itoek 
Hampshire cross, six months old, 
all laying. Phone 051w, Aurora. 

♦Iwl 

291 POULTRY WANTED 



Wanted Io bay — Live 
poultry. Any quantity. Bring 
them In or will call on request. 
Highest prices paid, W. S. Apple- 
ion, Oak Itldges, or phone Kin* 
Sarl4. lfi 



All kinds of II** poultry wanted. 
Will pay above market price at 
your door. Plione 657, Newmnr- 
ket. tfl 



ii 



MISCaLANEOUS 




» 



Haf WANTED 



Help wanted — Woman Io keep 
house and care for a slrls nge 3 
and e years. Phono Bruco Harri- 
son, 1515, Mount Albert. clwl 

Wanted— Housekeeper, 1 adult. 

Good eonifortoblo home. Write 
Era iind Express box 60, Clwl 



Wf repair all maKes of sewing 
machines. New machines $89,50 
up. Singer Sewing Center, New- 
market, 138 Main St, phone 1075 

tfl 



For ssOn—1 russes, surgical sup 
ports, elastic hosiery for those who 
suffer from varicose veins, ankte 
and knea trouble. Arch support* 
f-umbago bolts. Best Drug Store, 
phone 14, Newmarket. 

AU-Harlttl meumarje UbteU fW 
muscular, arthritic neuritis: and 
sciatic pains. Price Jim Bast 
Drug Store, phone 14, rfewmarkat 



CARD OF THANKS 

Mrs. Wm. J, Hamilton, Sulton 
West, wishes to thank Dr. Pcever, 
Mrs. Nobre Wright, Miss Grahnrn, 
Mrs. Newberry and the slnff of 
York County hospital for their 

kindness to her during her stay 
there, nnd thanks to her many 
friends who sent flowers, fruit and 
cards, the Union Street Institute 
for basket of fruit and Ravenshoe 
W.A, for flowers and enndy. 
Special thanks to Rev. Campbell 
and Rev. and Mrs. Killen for their 
visits. 

trARDOFTflANKB 
Mr. Wnlter W. Haines and fam* 
ily wish to express to their many 
friends, neighbors and relatives, 
their heartfelt thanks nnd appreci- 
ation for the nets of kindness, 
messages of sympathy nnd beauti- 
ful floral tributes extended to 
them In their recent sad bereave- 
ment In the toss of a dear wife and 
mot her, 

CARD OF THANKS 
I wish to express my sincere 
thanks to my friends nnd neigh- 
bors for all their letters, cards 
flowers, etc., and visits to the hos- 
pital. These acts were all appreci- 
ated mora than you will ever 
realize, 
Mrs. Pan. McOenerty, Keswick 

CARD OF THANKS 7 

Mr. nnd Mrs. J. I«cnney wish to 
express their very sincere appreci- 
ation for the many cards, plants, 
and flowers nnd acts of friendship 
extended to them during the Ill- 
ness and bereavement of Mr.s 
I*enney*s denr mother, Mrs. t*. 

Mlsener, who passed away Dee. IX 

CARD OF THANKS 

During my illness I appreciated 
the kindness of the nursing staff. 
Dr. a M. Peover» the Church of 
Ihe Nnzarene and friends for frull 
Rowers nnd cards . Thank you. 

John Shier, 



eyes can see us wool 
Rut many a silent tear Is 

While others are asleep 

Ever remembered by Frank and 
MnrJ. 

IVaree— In loving memory of a* 
dear husband and father, Berlle 
IMchnrd Penrce, who passed away 
.Ian. 1, 11151. 

Sadly missed by wife and family. 

» 

Woodruff— In loving memory of 
n denr husband and father. Thorn- 
as Woodruff, who passed away 
Jan. fi, 1051. 

Days of darkness still come o'er 
us, 

Tears In silence of ten flow; 
For memory keeps you ever near 

us, 

Though you died one yonr ago, 
Sndly missed by wife Martha and 
family. 

Wrlaiift — In loving memory of 
my dear wife, Eugenie, who passed 
away Jnn. 2, 10-18. 
The happy hours we onco enjoyed, 

How sweet their memory still; 

Rut death has left a loneliness, 
This world can novor fill. 
Sndly missed by husband Char- 
les. 

CARD OF THANHS 

I wish to Inke this opportunity 
to thank my many friends and 
neighbors, Dr. O. R. Case and the 
nurses nnd stnff of York County 
hospital for their kindness shown 
during my stay at the hospital. 

Mrs. I*. HLcka. 



. NOTICE 

North Owllllmbiiry Athletic 
Association will meet En Memorial 
Hall, Keswick, Monday, Jan. 7, 8 
p.m. for the purpose of elections 
and Insinuation of officers for 1052 
and any unfinished business of last 
year. 

Mrs. Onto McCenorty, Sec., 
Clark W. Martin, pres. 

elwl 



DEATHS 

Bolender — At Holland Lading 
on Saturday, Dec. 29, 1951 Jhnr- 
les Elmer Bolender, hu* *and of 
Agnes Ethel Elstone. .other of. 
Reginald nnd Claude Service was t 
held on Wednesdr . Temporary 
interment Newt v ,rket cemetery. 
Brodie— At >_r home, Gormloy, 
Ontario, Friday, Dee. 28th, Alary 
Elizabeth Doan. in her 93wl year, 
widow of the late Charles T. 
Brodle, nnd mother of Norman. 
Gormley, and Harriet (Mrs. Ceo. 
Quantz) Aurora. Funeral was 
held Monday, Dec. 31 from the 
chattel ■ of Wright nnd Taylor, 
Richmond Hill. Interment in 
Newmarket cemetery. 

Mr-Hale — At Newmarket on Sat- 
urdayy Dec. 29. 1951, Basil McHate, 
husband of Inn Marion Hall, bro- 
ther of Frank, Camp Bnrden, Wil- 
fred, Toronto; Bernard and Mrs. 
'Heritor: Hugo <Kntle), Newmarket. 
Requiem mass was at Saint John's! 
Church on Wednesday. Interment 
St. John's cemetery. 
= Hlddeli — ' At Toronto General 
Hospital, on Thursday, Jan. 3, 1952, 
Wllmot James Ulddell, ISO Millard 
Ave.,,. Newmarket, formerly of t 
Gcorglna Township, In his 79th 
year, husband of Kosnhelle Cam- 
eron arid fhtlwr of Robert of Sut- 
ton; Flossie (Mrs. I-loyd Smith), 
Of Newmarket; Mrs. Jean Wes- 
ley, of Newmarket, and Doris, de- 
ceased 19-11. Itestlng at the home \ 
of his son, Robert; In Sutton* for 
service In Sutton -United Church » 
on Saturday, JM. 5, fti 2 jfcSi; thv{ 
ferment Briar Ifil! Cemetery, 

itobitaiUe —.At- NevVnulrket, on 
Monday, Dee. 31* 395J, tieorge W; 
Mobltnllle, husband, of the late 
Ella Ada Smith and fat her of Nel- 
lie. Service was held on Thursday, 
Sweei^At York CoVmly bospltril* 
Tuesday. Jan. 1, 1952, Thomas 

Sweet, navenshoe, lu his 75th 
year, father of Kosle (Mrs. Smith), 
Newmarket. Clifford and Vern. 
Besting at the Slrnsler Funeral 
lromo, Queensvllle. Service In 
the clmpel on Friday, Jan. d, at 
2.ao p-nii Intermeiit -QuecnsvIHe; 
cemetery.; 

West -At Newmarket, on Mon- 
day, Dec. 31, 1951, George C. West, 
husband of the late Jennie Cul- 
tlng anil faiher of Elmn and Mrs. 
Iturl Donaldson. Service was held 
on Thursday. Interment New- 
market cemetery. 

OBITUARY 

Mrs, Miry Haines 

Mrs. Mary Maude Ostley 
Haines, one of the first members 
of the Sharon Women's institute, 
tiled nt her homo, It It. No. 1, 
Newmarket, on Deeomber 22, 
1951, after she had been In poor 
health for several years. 

Born In Newmarket on Febru- 
ary 12, 1B70, she was the daugh- 
ter of the late Mr. and Mrs. Wm. 
Ostley. She married Walter 
Willson Hnlnes. who suvvlves 

her. 
She was a member of Sharon 

United church, and throughout 

her lifetime was Interested in 

her home and In needlework ami 

gardening. 

Also surviving arc one son, 
Charles O. Haines; two daugh- 
ters, KditH nnd Illn Haines; nnd 
two grandchildren, Until and 
Dcth Haines. 

Rev. K. V. Warren, Quecns- 
ville, conducted funeral services 
on December 29 at the chapel of 
Hoadtiouso and Roso, Newmar- 
ket. Pnlllwarera were J. S. Os- 
borne, Walter Hall, Kenneth 
Wcdde), Frank Tate, Andrew 
Watson, and Alex Rutlcdge. 

Interment was hi Newmarket 
cemetery. 




I WEEK ONLY! 



- 






with REV. TOM SUMMERS 



.. ™^. ♦_ ^. 



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Beginning Sunday, Jan. 6th at 11 a.m. and 7 pjn. and 
continuing each week nt|;ht at 8 pjiL .(except Sat). Closing 

Service Sunday Jan, 13th. 



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MUSICAL NUMBERS 




NEWMARKET 






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for Christ 



SATURDAY. JAN. 5, 1952 



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CAPTAIN PAUR — Soprano cornet 
CAPTAIN COLLINS— Piano accordion 
CAPTAIN BEST — Speaker 



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NEWMARKET 

at 1:45 ».m. 

COME AND BltlNG A FRIEND 





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AttendOm of These 



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SUNDAY, JAN. 6, 1952 



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TRINITY UNITED: CHURCH 

ifey, *j; 5;: Aikcft, ^InMcr 
m % ItUtm A R.C.T., Orgnniat 

|3H- i^jn a ^l!Wiy^ , 'G^SftiijiiltoS^ aiul; 

'•ncceptlon^pt Slemuers; -. . 
\; 4i W6rs»iii»; tjjtf : Suiireine : '.- 
Business 1 * .V. 

TiiEi Sunday seuooi^ > 

S.4§ n:m : — TUe Sort tor School ?> 

91? a^^^i^iw Boginner^Md; 

,,.,"; fPllmiir^ •'_ '"-.' 

7 j>itK--Ser vko of song and • 
worship -■" 
"lluUdinu Tomorrow's World" 

Y«u will be welcome at Trinity 



■^ — ■ 



r," 



FREE MKTHODIST CHURCH 

REV. E. S. DULL, Pastor 

10 a.m.*— Sunday School , 

11 a.m. — Dlvina worship 

7 p.m.— EVANGELISTIC Rally. 

Wed., II p.ro.— Week of Prayer 

service 
Tluirs., & p.m.— Class meeting 

Everyone Weteome 



CARD OF THANKS 

Wo wish to express onr sincere 
nrotitmlo to ottr friends, nelRlitKirs, 
Dr, MacPhorson, Rev. PrltlrHo, Rev. 
Petersen and the nursing staff of 
York County lio.ipltnl for their 
acts of kindness in the recent Ill- 
ness ami death of a dear father, 

Clifford Sweet and family. 



ClltlKCIf OF THE NAZARENB 

Minister, Rev. A. E. Petersen 

Organist, Miss Juno Haines 

Pianist, Miss Norlne Greenwood 

Choir (Junior ), Mrs. A. E. 
Feter&cn 

Sunday School — 10 a.m. 

II am— Morning worship 

Evangelistic service — 7 p.m* . 

Junior meeting <Frl.)— 7 p.m, 

N.Y.P.S. Service (Frt.) 8 p.m. 

THE CHRISTIAN BAPTIST 
CHCRCII 

Main Street Newmarket 

Minister, Rev. Fred Brcckon 

Organist, Mrs, J. E. Cane 

11 a.m.— Communion service and 
welcoming of new members 

2. 'to p.m. — Sunday School 

7 p.m.— Gospel servlco 
"A Goad Beginning 1 ' 

Wo take pleasure In coopcrat? 
ing with the churches of the town 
in the annual week of prayer. 

All welcome * . 



ST. ANDREW'S 
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

[Newmarket 

Herman O. Fowler 
Mus, Bae. R.M.T, Organist 

#he new minister. Itcv. F. R 

-Meredith, will preach at 1! 

.- /^n.m, arid TjgJn;. S.S, 2,30 p.m. 

7 FRIENDS 1 MEETING 

Botsford Street 
9.45 a.m.— Sunday-school 
11 a.m.— Meeting for Worship 

Douglas ilopp 

7 p.m.-^Evening service 
B.30 pm.— Community sing-song 
Coma and worship with us 
AltWeloome 

Annual Meeting Jan. 10, 8 p.m. 
"Be ye steadfast, Immoveable, al- 
ways abounding in the work of 
the Lord"* 

"Thoso who know God are stead* 
fast to the end of life'% 






i 



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SALVATION ARMY CITADEL 

14 Queen 8t.,W, Newmarfcei 

Officers; Senior Copt, Ruth Best 

McutenDnt, Arlian Cameron 

_ ... 

Sunday - ■•■■ ■'■■■■"■ 

U a.m.— Holihesa meeting 

3 p.nv^Sunday school 

7 p,m,— Gospel meeting 

Every Wednesday • Home League 

Everyone welcome 

TUB OOSPEJL TABERNACL1 

Millard Ave, 

Pastor. REV. A. Ri YlBIi>lNO 
Pianist, MISS VW0£ CURTIS 
One week of special meeAiofi 
with Rev. Tom Summers / 

Field Sec'y of Associated 

Gospel Churches ■'-. 
Sunday at U a.m. and 7 p.m> 
Week nights . (except Sat.) at « 

p.m. from Jam 6 Id Jan. IS 

inclusive , ■• "":"■" r; : 
MB— Sunday school 
1! a.m.~Morning worship ^>;; 
7 p.m. Evening' service ;: ; 
l\ier., 8 p.m.— r^aye? 
Thura.. . g^Q^Wcimen^ 

TiU 7 



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THE CLASSIFIED PAGE THAT THE MOST 



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Office Cat Reports \ 

Catnips By Ginger 



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••Well, the T.T.C. sod the 

buses are on. strike," says the 
Jr Office cynic this morning. 

fc ■'"•:■ "Yeah." 

tt A darn nuisance," says the 

office cynic. 
"Yeah." 

-^What's wrong with those 

^guys?" asks the ottfce cynic 

"You'd think they could settle 
these matters without tying up 
one of the largest transporta- 
tion systems in North America." 

:«Yeah." 

"The papers say only 10 cents 
separates the commission and 
the union.'* 

"Yeah." 

"They're getting too much to 
begin with." 

"Don't agree." 

"What do you mean, you 
don't agree?" 

"Wouldn't take their jobs for 
twice the money." 

"Why not? Nuthing to it 
Just sit and drive around the 
city all day." 

"It's the people." 

"What do you mean, the peo- 
ple?" 

"Would you put up with To-* 
rento crowds day in and day 
out?" 

"Well . . r 

"Exactly," 



disrupt the normal routine, 
we've always tried to get out a 
weekly issue. 
This insistence upon regular 

publication has had its funny 

side. A few years ago, before 
we got our present press, the 
old newspaper press was sub- 
ject to all sorts of haiards. 
There were times when we 
used to run off the paper with 
a welder standing by to put to- 
gether the broken parts. 

Our worst problem in that 
respect was the issue before 
an election some five years ago. 
The press broke down com- ■ ' 

pletely with the paper half PAGE 
printed. There was little hope ^^^— 
that we could finish the press 
run of a paper filled with elec- 
tion speeches. So we loaded 
the forms onto Gibbons Trans- 
port and took them to Bramp- 
ton to be printed. We got them 
back on Friday morning. 



Serving Nmrmttot, Avwa end *• rurol dbtrkh of North York 
1W N*wmark«f Era U5J Tho Express HtroW 119* 

Publish^ vmy Thursday at 142 Main St., Nowmorkt, by tim Nowmarkottro owl B*pnss lim***; Subscription $4 for two yon, 
$2.50 for <x» y*or, m advance. Singh cop** an 5c oath. Mmmlm of Oast A WotVhs of Canada, Canadian W—Hy 

Association, and tin Audit turooo of Orcutefiow. Autborb*d of Smcond Oast MaH, Post OHito Dtportmont, 

torn a. MEtn . . Ma***** ten* 'W1MM* . t :mmfm». 







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sim: Friday; tWC^urih day of January, nineteen hundred and MW& 



- 



wage and taxi bills; write an 
editorial on the milk market; 
another on speed traps an 3 

signs. 

Dairy Farmer: Go Into soy 
beans and hops. 

George Gaskett, sports edi- 
tor: Cover snooker games and 
change name of column to Gas- 
kett's Basket! 

Caroline Ion, women's editor; 
Tell them that it's really a 
Man's World. Why humor 
them? 

en't paid toe pnone out Junior, the ace reporter; 

decided to sacrifice; ffiehy- Quit. It will do you and u* 
. dro discount andWnemM^; good^;" -J^ 

until January for tfieS moneys Half the merchants: Close 
They can keep their old dis- Mondays and Saturdays, open 

oon and ev- 



- What a miserable financial 
month this i*. I wonder if 
other people are as fearful of 
looking at their bank books as 
this correspondent. I wonder 
if everybody is as broke as this 
after the holiday. 

The last time I looked at mine 
|Vas December IS when I threw 
the account book in the drawer 
aM forgot about it until Janu- 
ary- J ' 

Meanwhile, there has been a 

wild Chrisonas sending spree. 

ie phone bill 



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As 



Nineteen hundred and fifty-two is a.year of special 
f £2?Si5a i S S ■ s 5K nificance to the Era and Express because it is the 
and the road to Brampton was paper's centennial year. And while there are older 

newspapers in Canada, a 100th birthday is still suffi- 
ciently rare td encourage a considerable pride in the 



rough and slippery. 






This, thank heaven, is the 
last "off schedule" paper for a 
while. The Christmas and New 
Year's dates gave us an extra 
holiday or two, but it threw 
our publishing schedule for a 
loop. 

We've always adhered to the 
view that when a subscriber 
pays his subscription fee, he is 
entitled to 52 issues of the 
paper so even when holidays 



At the moment, our biggest 
problem is electricity. As the 
sheets of newsprint pass 
through the press, they pick tip 
a lot of static electricity under 
certain conditions. The appren- 
tice thought we were ribbing 
h?rn untii he picked up a good 
shock from a pile of newsprint. 

The electricity makes the 
sheets of newsprint cling to 
each other or stick to the press 
with the result that many 
sheets are spoiled in printing. 
The only sure cure we have 
found is a liberal sprinkling of 
water which explains why the 
paper sometimes looks a little 
rumpled. 






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from the Files of 

'25 and 50 Yews A 



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DECEMBER 31. 1926 

Nominations at Newmarket: 
for mayor, J. E. Nesbitt, A. B. 
Currey, H^trry Doyle, Dr. C. 
A. Ames, W. H. Eves. 

Notwithstanding the in-. 
creased staff at the post office 
last week, they v/ere all busy 
from morning to night and then 
had extra work distributing the 
night mail after the wicket 
dosed. The biggest mails out 
and the biggest mails in. ever 
since the war. 

Mr. Jones, the painter, dis- 
tributed an attractive calendar 

among his patrons last week. 
The Salvation Army band 
serenaded the town on Christ- 
mas Eve, and picked up a lot of 
loose silver for benevolent 
work. 

Ski-ing has made tremendous 
strides in Canada during the 
last few years. This great out- 
door sport has swept the coun- 
try from coast to coast. 

What a delightful weekend 
the weatherman gave lis for 
Christmas. 

The citizens of Aurora may 
well feel proud of the record of 
the tov/n in 1020 Among the 
improvements, a new entrance 
to the Mechanics' Hal! v/as 
built; and a health nurse has 
been engaged and an epidemic 
of any kind among the chil- 
dren was unknown during the 
year. 

» — * * * 

The matron and staff of the 
York County hospital desire to 
express their thanks for dona- 
tions sent to the hospital dur- 
ing Christmas week, including 
choice chickens from the New- 
market Women's Institute, and 
from a friend in Holt, a jar of 
cherries, raspberries, plums and 
black currants. 

In the hurry and rush of the 
week before Christmas two bad 
mistakes occurred in last week's 
"Era". One was that the "50 
Year" heading was put over the 
25.year items. 



JANUARY 3, 1902 
V/e are in receipt of a hand- 
some copy of "The New Testa- 
ment in Braid Scots," from the 
translator, the Rev. W. W. 
Smith of St. Catharines and 
formerly an esteemed citizen 
of Nev/market. The work of 
the printer, Alexander Card- ; 

ncr. Paisley, Scotland, has been 
well and beautifully done. 

Mrs. J. E. Cane has the love- 
liest Christmas cactus we have 
ever seen. 

Schools open for the long 
term next Monday. 

The holiday trade the past 
tv/o or three weeks has been 
the largest for some y^ars The 
roads were in good condition 
for wheeling and the weather 
comfortable for travel. 

Much was said at the New- 
market nomination meeting on 
Monday evening about the 
price of electric light. 

Qucensville: In Kettleby 
items which appeared in the 
Era last v/eek, it stated that 
some person out there took first 
prize on heavy hog at the Au- 
*. ^?. Christmas market. We, 
beg^i^prrect our correspond- 
ent intfc matter, as Mr. Gil- 
bert Johnsto. of Qucensville 
captured the reo f, }ket, his hog 
weighing 617 pounds. 

Toronto: At the pavilion in 
Allan Gardens on Saturday af- 
ternoon, the Salvation Army 
fed l,o6o hungry men and wo- 
men and children. The tables 
at the building groaned under 
the weight of good cheer. 
Mr. Davis McCarthy of Kes- 
wick has purchased that fine 
farm of 200 acres on Yonge St. 
from Mr. John S. Millard. 

Headline; "The Boers Climb 
a Precipitous Hill and Inflict; 
Disaster Upon the British." 

Baldwin: Let every true Me- 
thodist be on hand at the Egypt 
hot fowl supper and entertain- 
ment on Monday evening next; 
The best cooks in the province 
are here. 



accomplishment. 

The Era and Express was founded under the name 
of The New Era by G. S. Porter who, according to 
legend, came to Newmarket in 1852 on the first train 
to come this far. Since that date, the paper has had 
a colorful history, has undergone many changes. We 
hope in future issues to recall in detail some of the 
milestones it passed. 

For the moment, however, we feel it more approp- 
riate to place first what the editors Ooi the Era and 
Express have always placed first, its outspoken edi- 
torial page. Through all those hundred years, if there 
was one particular aspect of the paper which has stood 
above all others, it has been the insistence of its editors 
Upon speaking their piece tr 

It has not always been a popular policy. There 
have been times when the paper and its editors have 
been bitterly criticized from public platforms, or in 
written protest. The arguments have waged hotly as 
the headlines in the file copies testify. And there have 
been times when tte editors, intent upon recording their 
opinions, have been carried away into error by their 
enthusiasm. 

But if this preoccupation with the editorial section 
of the paper has mixed its editors in public controversy 
or laid their necks across the block of public opinion, 
it has also won for the paper a succession of honors. 
Its editorial page has captured several national and 
provincial awards for excellence* 

III recent years there has been a tendency of its 
editors to encourage regular contributions of opinion v 
and comment from district correspondents. Thus, in a ■■*> 
current issue, there are two sports columns, two 
women's columns, a farm column, columns of Aurora 
opinion, and two miscellaneous columns. The authors 
of these columns, all district writers, are given the 
widest possible latitude, and at times, there has been 
considerable conflict between their views. 

This is all to the good. A newspaper which simply 
informs is not a newspaper at all. A newspaper which 
seeks to give the widest possible scope for discussion 
and statement of opinion is one which best serves 

the public. An honest opinion, forcefully stated, is an 
essentia! tool of democracy. We are less concerned . 
that there l)e agreement with what we, or the other 
contributors to the paper, may write than we arc with . 
the belief that what appears in the paper will create, . 
broaden, and enliven interest in public affairs. ' V 

UNFORTUNATE LAW 



economic system in favor of opening the way to another* 
The bill was a blanket bill, aimed at a practice which 
has become a cornerstone of our economic system. It 
attempted too much. Far more to the point would have 
been a series of bills aimed at correcting such abuses as 
did exist under the old system. 

The government is apparently aware of the dangers 

which exist in the law. Spokesmen have assured wor- 
ried retailers that if the new law is abused, corrective 
legislation will be passed. But why pass a law in the 
first place if it contains the seeds of potential abuses? 
And finally, was there sufficient examination of 
the principle involved, that the manufacturer has a 
right to set the price of his product? When it comes 
down to the fine point, why shouldn't he set the retail 
price if he wants to? By nullifying such a practice the 
government has moved into issues which it does not 
seem to have fully defined. 

Many retailers,. 'while admitting the threat the 
bill offers to their existence, do not believe that prices 
will be reduced as a result of its passage. They main- 
tain that retail mark-ups have already been cut to the 
minimum. Time alone can fell- But regardless of the 
immediate outcome, to place a bill, admittedly open to 
abuse, and of such potential importance to the national 
economy, is not the best way to encourage national 
confidence in other aspects of the government's fiscal 
policy. 



IS 



ru pay i 
ready. . I don't care if 

even "turn off my lights, 
then the slove wouldn't 
would it, nor the refrigerator 
or the furnace or even the coffee ' 
pereulator. On second thought^ 
Fd better pay the hydro. How 
dependent we are on services. 

I see further gloom. There 
a big insurance premium 
comjng up and the oil bill has 
to be paid. 

Gotta-pay up the taxi account 

too. I wonder if X could get 

that out of the firm somehow. 
Charge it to good will or some- 
thing? No, the accountant is a 

stickler. Nevr get by her. 

Maybe something will turn 
up in the New Year. Maybe 
we will inherit, 

♦ * * 
Your favorite correspondent 

has lined up a few resolutions 

for people on this newspaper 

and a few others aroun3 town. 

Bitter though some may seem. 

they are in good faith. A few 

beefs won't hurt. The follow- 

ing people resolve to 

The boss; Pay dinger a living 



?w. 



The other half the merchants: 

Do just the opposite. 

* M "- merchants: Don't tell 




s m * 

. TftW|i r cbuncil members: Love 
one another and do unto others 
as you would have, them do 
unto you. Make it a cardinal 
rule never to say* "I wouldn't 
want this to get in the paper 
but , ." 

Public school board mem- 
bers: Love one another. 

The Spitfires: Try Lloyd's of 
London and appoint an am- 
bassador to Orillia without 
portfolio. 

Town clerk: Remember rate* 
payers are people and count 
to ten. 

Firemen: Ignore those side- 
line remarks, use that axe if it 
is necessary. 

Town engineer: To do three 
things at once. 

Aurora editor: Lead kindly 
Hght. 

Bus drivers: Oh, sleep, that 
knits the ravelled sleeve of 
care. 

- 



:^;:_; 






V I 



I ■ 



/ 



"I 



* ' 



- * ■ 



FIREMEN'S HAZARD 



' 



A fire in Newmarket is one of the major social 
events of the year. When the fire whistle blows, every- 
one rushes to the doors on Main St. to cheer the pant- 
ing firemen up the hill to the fireball. In more distant 
streets, residents walk, run, or drive to Main St. to 
watch the fire engines start out. It is a gay and color- 
ful spectacle. 

The firemen are a sociable crew and enjoy a get- 
together as well as the next man, but they do feel that 
certain rules of etiquette should be observed. They feel, 
for example, that the receiving line might better form 
behind the fire trucks instead of in front. And they 
feci too that as hosts, they should have precedence on 
the roads and not be forced to chug along behind a 
line up of cars. % 

it is becoming a serious matter. A fire engine 
should have the right of way to a fire. When curious 
spectators clog the roads they are hindering the firemen. 
Those delays could cost lives; certainly, delays have 
cost many dollars in additional damage. The police 
do a good job of directing traffic at the scene of a fire 
but even they are delayed by traffic jams. 



We have a questionnaire at 
hand inquiring on behalf of the 
Crop Improvement Association 
of this county about our experi- 
ence with grass silage during 
the past season, x 

We want to commend the 
Crop Improvement Association. 
first of all, because we think 
that it is an excellent idea to 
try and bring together the 
practical know-how and the re- 
sult of past effort within the 
county. Conditions will vary 
from locality to locality, even 
within the limited area of this 
county. Too many experimen- 
tal results, white obtained un- 
der very strict scientific condi- 
tions, are not applicable out- 
side the area where they have 
been produced. 

Secondly, we want to go on 
record as being very much in 
favor of grass silage. When we 
look at our cows and the way 
they behave while fed this 
silage, and then look at our hay, 
we cannot help but come to tho 
conclusion that we should have 
more of the one and loss of the 
other. 

Two factors in our opinion 
prevent the practice of putting 
up gross silage, from becoming 
more popular—aside from the 
fact that many farmers are re- 



When the fire whistle blows, motorists should clear luctant to change. One is the 



the roads so that the fire engines have a ready access 
to the scene of the alarm* We would suggest that 
those drivers who ignore this elementary consideration 
be haled into court. 






* t 



. 






IDIOT'S DELIGHT 



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V " 



\ 



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. 



t 



i ■ 



* . ~ 







The 1 government's amendment to the Combines 
Investigation Act prohibiting manufacturers from set- 
ting retail prices is regarded by many Newmarket, and 
Aurora merchants as their death warrant. Without the 
protection of set prices, they fear they'll be forced to 
tlie wall by price cutting by chains and large depart- 
ment stores, • 

There is some justification to their belief. The 
small merchant cannot hold out in a large scale price 
cutting war. And the government's legislation encourv 
ages such a danger. We doubt that for the present 
there'll be much price culling. Shouldit start however, 
there would be heavy casualties among tho independents 
: 'before the government could stand by its assurance 
that it will pass additional legislation to curb excesses 
"if necessary." .* 

The independent merchant is an important part 
of iW : .^ii^Otil: «^pAi>j|il^ J'fe iWOiber la A balance 
wheel which checks the large stores and chains. If 
the independents were to be heavily reduced in number, 
the consumer would suffer. We don't believe this factor 
was given enough consideration by the government when 
the bill was written. 



WORKING 



'/•^ 



WITH TOWNSHIP 



- V- 



1 _-\ v 



In a notice published during the Christmas week 
in the Bra and Express, the township of Whitchurch 
planning board drew attention to the need for closer 
liaison between the township and neighboring munici- 
palities. Both Newmarket and Aurora are undergoing . 
a steady process of expansion. In Newmarket, it has 
meant tho annexation of additional land to the west 
of town. In another few years, more land will bo 
required if the present rate of growth is maintained. 

If the land adjacent to municipal boundaries was 
simply farm land, there would be no great difficulty. 
But Whitchurch, as well as Aurora ami Newmarket, is 
passing through a period of expansion, Land adjacent 
to the municipalities is being sub-divided and sold as 
building lots. The problem is to make sure now that 
when Newmarket and Aurora further expand, there 
will l>e orderly arrangement of streets and public ser- 
vices and not a haphazard growth on their borders, 

Tho Whitchurch notice said: "At present there is 
nothing (except common sense) $&p^ 
ship of Whitchurch issuing building permits authorizing 

The fact is that the bill should never have been «* construction of a slighter house for horses or a 
passed in ita present form, and not only because of the : wrecking yard, to be built just over the boundary of 
threat it represents to the independent operator. The 
purpose of the bill was to curb abuses which had arisen, 
under the old system of price setting, to encourage ; 
price reduction and increase competition. Wo doubt : y 
if any one piece of legislation could accomplish thesis ;-v 
altruistic aims to begin with. ■> 

It seems to us that all the bill has done has been 
to remove the threat of one form of abuse of our 



^:ost ot equipment and coat of 
Custom work. It is a very ex* 
pensive business to buy a for- 
age harvester and blower. And 
when you have those two pieces 
of equipment and decide to 
build your own wagons, you 
really act n shock. With a 
shortage of blacksmiths and the 
expose of * steel braces and 
angle iron, tires, etc., wagons 
can run you into real money. 
If you have It in your mind 
to get it done by another man. 
you are still not getting it very 
cheaply. Depending on the 
equipment the man uses, it will 
cost you from $10 to $15 an 
hour. 
There are other difficulties. 

One of the crucial points in 

grass silage is the amount of 
time it has to be wilted before 
getting it in. At least this Is 
tlift way we look at It. 

With custom working mach- 
inery in short supply, it Is hard 
to know when to cut and rake. 
There Is a further point. Tho 



green material you put in has \ 
to be green grass and not ma- 
ture hay. We only have this 
|pr a limited amount of time. 

.To make things even more 
complicated, the custom outfits 
have a way of doing things too 
well, tfiat is to say, too fast. A 
good machine, with a field 
close to the barn, will have the 
silo full in 5-6 hours and then 
they are away. Three days 
later, one has 6-8 feet more to 
fill. It is very hard to do this. 
The custom men might be mites 
away. 

All this leads tis to the sec- 
ond difficulty: labor. The cus- 
tom silo filler is liable to fill 
your barnyard with machines, 
wagons and tractors and any* 
thing that you need. All you 
have to supply is men in the 
silo and on the tractors and to 
unload and to cut and rake the 
hay. All this has to be done 
in a great hurry. One of the 
only remaining advantages of 
corn silage is the time of the 
year when it is done. One has 
more time to do it and it can 
be done gradually, more so 
than grass silage. 

Well, what is the solution? 
First, we think tho season of 
grass should be stretched, if 
possible, by pasturing some ot 
the fields or part of them and 
put it in when it grows up 
again. Thus the allage making 
season will be stretched by a 
week or ten days. Secondly, 
more equipment has to be 
bought by somebody. This is 
really a case where neighbors 
with the same basic plan of 
farming could get together and 
share the heavy expense of the 
equipment. And finally, we do 
feel that the custom ailo tillers 
should go a step further and In 
return for the work offered, 
maybe by the promise of hav- 
ing it for more than one year, 
should supply more of the la- 
bor. In other words, let them 
hire a band of men and do it 
all, that is outside of the silo. 

We think the grass silage is 
here to stay. Wo think the 
equipment is available. The 

timing and organising remains 
to be done. We are looking 
forward to the meeting of the 
Crop Improvement Association 
where it will bo discussed. 






- 



- - 



THE OLD HOME T(3WK . — >" By STANM [\ 



the residential sections of tho neighboring -municipal- 
ities. Obviously we would not Issue permits for these 
^#bui|t In the contra o^OU 

'Whitchurch has indicated its willingness to ^of 

jJKrfdfft it fe effective, If Newmarket and Aurora are 
to have orderly and economical development, there must 
bo intor^lannfrtg witli tho townshiiv 



■**• 



• ■ 



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- 

Th* tfof» Is the servant, not ffw masfee, ot Am peopfs/ ffcs ftot» Is their guaranfe* 
ogoinst Inhingemmti en their right*, their ag ent In International and national /« wm; it 
h not the function of tho *tate to auumo tho direction of fnoso activities which nut 

Oil individual choice, ., 




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1IITHIIAY 
CLUB 



Birthday wishes are extended 
this week to: 

UMtk Ming, BftWliD, 12 S **» 



- 



« yean old aw Mowbj, Dee. 31. 

Georg 1 ■* Bose ADen, New- 

—iter, 14 yean *td «• Mo*d»y, 

Dee. 31. 

Mm FrestawL, Betbesd^ 5 years 

•ad «m Tuesday, Jaa, 1. 

Maty Johnson, Newmarket, t 
years old *n Tuesday, Jan. 1. 

Grace Marie Stevenson, Auro- 
ra, 14 years eM on Tharsrfay, 

Jan. 3. 

Winsttf red Mary Evans, New* 
■market, 1 year old on Friday, 
Jan. 4. 

Send in your name, address, 
age and become a member of the 
Newmarket Era and Express 
birthday club. 



HANDCRAFT SHOP 

The tea room and handcraft 
shop which was opened at 1 
Water St. before Christmas will 
remain open indefinitely. Under 

the sponsorship of the Newmar- 
ket Handcraft group, the tea 

room is operated by Mrs. Nor- 
man WnHefield. Tea and cookies 
are served daily, Monday to Sat- 
uday, inclusive, from 2.30 to 4.30 
p.in. This is a restful spot to re- 
lax for a few minutes during a 
shopping trip in town to enjoy a 
good cup of tea. 



V 



Marian Martin Patterns 






- 




F.M. CHURCH HAS 
WATCH NIGHT 

A watch-night service was 
held at the Free Methodist 
church, Newmarket, on New 
Year's eve. The congregations 
from the churches in Holt and 
Belhaven joined with the New- 
market members for the service. 
There was a large attendance. 

Rev. and Mrs. N. T. Perry, 
parents of Mrs. E. S. Bui J, were 
present. Rev, Perry is a former 
Newmarket pastor. He assisted 
the pastor. Rev. Bull, as did Rev. 
L. Casement, Holt, with Rev. R. 
C. Babcock, district superintend- 
ent, bringing the final message 
before the midnight hour. Mrs. 
Evelyn Varney and Miss Bernice 
Kutledge, Holt, gave a vocal duet 
as did Mrs. Roy Martin and Mrs. 
Richard Beckett. 



- 1 



ANNUA!, MEETING 

tee annual meeting and 
election of officers for York 
County Hospital Women's 
auxiliary will be held in the 
Agricultural Board room, 
Botsford St, Newmarket, on 
Tuesday, Jan. 8, at 3 pin. 
Tea will be served after the 
business meeting. Members 
are asked to note the change 
of date. A cordial invitation 

Is extended to all ladies In 
tnose districts of the county 
serviced by the hospital to 
attend Ibis meeting. 

EVANGELINE AUXILIARY 

The Evangeline auxiliary of the 
W.MS., Trinity United church, 
Newmarket, will meet in the 
school room on Tuesday, Jan^ 8, 
at 8 o'clock. Rev. M. J. Aiken 
will address the meeting and the 
secretaries will present their an- 
nual reports. 

r 



9001 SEES 2-10 

■ 

Gay remnants for this sweet 
dress! This frock uses contrast in 
the thriftiest way! Uses scallops in 
Ihe prettiest way — all around the 
yoke and bib-front- Let her choose 
between short-puff sleeves or long 
ones. Both are right for now 
Easy-sew, Mother! 
Pattern 9001 in Children's sizes 2, 
4, 6, 8, 10. Size 6 takes 1 1-2 yards 
35-inch; 1-2 yard contrast. 

Send your order to MARIAN 
MARTIN, care of the Newmarket 
Era and Express, Pattern Dept., 
Newmarket 

"I his easy-Jo-use pattern gives 
perfect fit. Complete, illuslratei 
Sew Chart shows you every step. 

Send THIKTY-FIVE CENTS 
(35c) in coins (stamps cannot be 
accepted) for this pattern. Print 
plainly SIZK, NAMJ2, AUUKKS3, 
STYLE NUMBER. 



12—20 

R9041 30-* 



Newmarket Social News 



— Mr. and Mrs. Molvourne 
Haines and daughter, Rhonda 
Lynn, Toronto, spent New Year's 
with Mr. and Mrs. Elliott Haines 
and family. 

— Mr. and Mrs. John Barnard, 
Rochester, v/cre guests last week 
of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Wass 
and family. 

— Rev. and Mrs. A. E. Petersen 
held open house at the Nazarene 
parsonage on New Year's eve. 
Tea was served from 3 to 1 1 p.m. 
Mrs. Arthur Brice poured. 

— Miss Lorraine Wass, Barrio, 
spent her Christmas vacation 
with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
Charles Wass. 

—Miss Ella Rae and Wilbert 
York spent New Year's with 
Miss Rae's sister, Mrs. Florence 
Tate, and family. 

—Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Mit- 
chell and family, Mr. and Mrs. 
Bud Acorn, Willowdalc, and 
Stuart Mitchell, Halifax, N.S., 
spent New Year's v/ith their par- 
ents, Mr. and Mrs. E. A. Mitchell. 

— Sunday guests of Mr. and 
Mrs. Bruce Andrews v/cre Mr. 
and Mrs, Gordon Jarvis and 
Lynnc, Newtonbrookc. •* 




JaNUARYSAUE 

* _ 'J 

Clearance of snow suits, station 
wagon coats and 3-piece coat 
/ sets 

25 PERCENT 



DISCOUNT 



THE 



Jack & Jill Shoppe 

Six Minutes To Twelve Years 
Opp. Post Office Newmarket 

Phone 583 



—Mr. and Mrs. W. If. Miller 
and family spent the New Year's 
weekend in Hamilton, the guests 
of Mr. and Mrs.. J. O. Ironside. 

—Rev. and Mrs. A. E. Peter- 
sen and family were guests on 
New Year's day at the home of 
Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Moore. 

—Mr. and Mrs. W. John O'Hal- 
Ioran and son, Barry, Gait, spent 
Christmas and New Year's v/ith 
Mr. and Mrs. Walter O'Halloran. 

— Mrs. Beatrice Pemberton, 
accompanied by her two child, 
rcn and her father - in - lav/, 
James Pemberton, spent Christ- 
mas with her parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. Amos York, Brov/nhill. 

— Guests on Christmas day of 
Mr. and Mrs. Don. Cameron in- 
cluded Miss B. Thompson, Toron- 
to, Thomas Rank, Mr. and Mrs. 
James Duncan, Mr. and Mrs. 
Robert Rank, Aurora, and Mr. 
and Mrs. Ernest Rank, Mr, Nor- 
man Rank, Langstaff, Mr. and 
Mrs. Ed. Dailey, Aurora, and 
Miss Joyce McMullen, Newmar- 
ket. 

—Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Doh- 
bie and Patsy left last Thursday 
for Florida for three months' va- 
cation. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Harry Sturgcss, 
Miss Mary I^each and Mr. Don 
Sturgessy Toronto, spent New 
Year's day with Mr. and Mrs. 
Ray Sturgcss. 

— Mr. and Mis. Jack Tolchard 
and Mrs. Tolchard Sr., Toronto, 
spent New Year's with Mrs. W. 
Calvert. 



■ 



NOTICE 

Commencing Monday, Jan. 7, 1052 
The Management of the 



ARCTIC LOCH 



«A 



Retail department as well as locker storage will be 
under the direction of Hairy LeadlieUcr, a well known 
butcher of this district and a roddent of Newmarket. 



CASH AND CMIIY 






■ ■ . - 



Poultry bought, best prices paid 
Sold both retail and wholesale for less 



■ 



J. E, SLOSS 




WATCII-NIGUT SERVICE 

A watch-night service was held 
at the Church of the Nazarene, 
on Nov/ Year's eve. Hev. A. E. 
Petersen conducted the service. 



BROWNIES, GUIDES 
RESUME MEETINGS 

Regular meetings of the New- 
market Brownie pack and Girl 
Guide company v/ill be held next 
v/eek in the ficout hall. The 
Urownies meet on Monday night 
and the Guides on Wednesday 
night v/ith the meetings Iggin- 
ninjj at ft p.m. 

Brownie leaders are Mrs. Hay 
Sherrard and Mrs. Orley llnyes. 
Mrs. Earlhy Thompson and Mrs. 
Horace Jnques are the Guide 
leaders. Girls must Ik? eight 
years old to join Brownies and 
twelve for Guides, 



GIRLS TO PRESENT 
PLAY TO MOTHERS 

Members of the Newmarket 
Brov/nie pack will provide the 
program for the Scout-Guide 
Mothers 1 auxiliary meeting 
which will t>e held in the Scout 
hall on Monday, Jon. 7, at 8 p.m. 
The Brownies will' present the 
ploy they put on at the Christmas 
season. There will be a short 
talk on Brownie activities. 

Light refreshments will be 
served. A special invitation if 
extended to the mothers of 
Brownies, Cubs, Scouts, Guides 
and Rangers to attend. A cordial 
invitation is extended to the 
public. . 






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• 

Newmarket Social News 



Presto change-oh! This will 
double your wardrobe! Wear 
these soft-but-classic separates to- 
gether as a ffress, mix with other 
blouses and skirts to give them the 
latest fashion! Everything here is 
simple to sew! « 

Pattern R9041: Misses' sizes 12, 
U, 16, 18, 20, 30, 32, 34, 35, 38, 40, 
42. Size 16 skirt, scarf, 3 1-8 yards 
30-inch; blouse 1 5-8 yards. 

Send your or<ier to MARIAN 
MARTIN, care of The Newmarket 
Era and Express, Pattern DepL, 
Newmarket. 

Tljis easy-to-use pattern gives 
perfect fit Complete, Illustrated 
Sew Chart shows you every step. 

Send TJHRTV-FIVE CENTS 
(35c) In coins (stamps cannot be 
accepted) for this pattern. Print 
plainly SIZE, NAME, ADDRESS, 
STYLE NUMBER. 



— Mr. and Mrs. George Keay, 
Hallantrae, called on Mr. and 
Mrs- Roy Martin on New Year's 

day. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Allan Webster, 
Mr. and Mrs. Claude Webster, 
Toronto, Mr. and Mrs. Roscoe 
Miller and family, Unionville, 
were dinner guests on New 
Year's day of Mr. and Mrs. 
Everett Miller. 

— Miss Joan Flintoff spent 
New Year's day with her aunt. 
Miss Greeta Flintoff. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Charles Perkio 
and Ronnie, Oshawa, and Mrs. 
Bevens Jones were New Year's 
guests of Mr. and Mrs. W. H. 
Traviss. 

— Mr. and Mrs. James Miller 
and family, Yonge St., spent 
Christmas day with Mrs. Miller's 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur 
Brice. 

— Mr. and Mrs. H. V. Fenner 
returned to Lewisburg, Penn., on 
Thursday, after spending the 
holiday season with Mr. and Mrs. 

Bruce Cutting and family. 
—Mr. and Mrs. W. .R. Draper 

and Shirley, Toronto, spent New 

Year's day with Mr. and Mrs. 
H. G. Gibbons and the other 
members of the family in town. 

—Donald Nichols, Toronto, 

spent the weekend with Mr. and 

Mrs. Roy Martin and family. 

—Mr. and Mrs. Bruce Clark- 
son, Dixie, visited over New 

Year's v/ith Mr. and Mrs. Bruce 
Andrews and family. 

—Mr. and Mrs. William Bliz- 
zard and family spent New 
Year's day with Mr. and Mrs. 
Roy Meads. 

— Mr. and Mrs. A. E. N. Young, 
London, were weekend guests of 
Mr. and Mrs. Nelson Ion. 

—Fit. Sgt. Alvoy Blain, De- 
Havilland, spent Christmas with 
Mr. and Mrs. Borden Blain and 
family. 

— Mrs. Arthur Brammer spent 
Christmas and New Year's with 



Mr. and Mrs. Bruce McClymont 
and children. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Norman Park, 
Bob anJ Nancy Ruth, and Mr. 
and Mrs. Charles Cumber spent 
New Year's with Mrs. F. Cum- 
ber and family. 

— Sunday guests of Mr. and 
Mrs. Everett Miller were their 
four daughters and their fami- 
lies, Mrs. Robert Bell and two 

children, Mrs. Bruce Bales and 
children. Miss Jean Miller, Au- 
rora, and Mr. and Mrs. Allan 
Webster, Toronto. 

— Miss Audrey Brillinger, Pine 
Orchard, was a weekend guest of 
Miss Vonda Martin. 

— Donald Brice, Eastern Naz- 
arene college, Wollaston, Mass., 
spent his Christmas vacation 
with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
Arthur Brice, returning to* col- 
lege on New Year's day. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Bar- 
ker and Murray, Yonge St., spent 
Christmas in Toronto with their 
daughter. 

—Mrs. A. Thompson, Newmar- 
ket, and Mr. and Mrs. J. Hunter, 
London, spent the Christmas holi- 
days with Mr. and Mrs. S. Buck- 

roll and family, Tillsonburg, the 

parents of Mrs. Hunter. 

—Mrs. A. Mair, daughter Mar- 
Iene, son Billic and grandson 
Johnny spent New Year's day 
in Hamilton with her brothers 
Harry and John McGhec. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Johnnie Camp- 
bell, Hamilton, spent New Year's 
weekend in town visiting rela- 
tives and friends. 

— Miss Evelyn Ross, Winnipeg, 
visited on Sunday evening with 
her uncle and aunt, Mr. and Mrs. 
Wm. Sawdon. 

— Mrs. W. R. Ashenhurst at- 
tended the funeral of her cousin, 
Mr. T. H. Evans, on Monday, also 
visiting her brother, Dr. D. J. 
Bagshaw. 



■ 



.•■ 




The Common 




_. 



By Isabel Inglis ColvMe 

CHRISTMAS MEMORIES 






Amonj? the many things of beauty and joy and 
glory that belong to Christmas, there is one that makes 
itself felt each year because of its pure appropriateness 
to the season of which it sings so gloriously — of course 
J speak of Handel's "Messiah", 



I think part of its appeal lies 
in the fact that it is a triumph of 
faith over despair, for its con- 
ception was at a time when Han- 
del's affairs were at a low ebb. 

But from its performance at 
Dublin music hall on April 13, 
1742, to the performance by the 
Trinity United church senior 
choir on the evening of Decem- 
ber 18, 1951— of which I wish to 
say a few words — it has added 
laurels to laurels. 

On that evening, although the 
weather was fnr from co-opera- 
tive, a goodly number of people 
braved the storm and formed 
one of the most appreciative au- 
diences I have ever seen. 

The choir wore — very proudly 
— their new gowns and caps, and 
let no one say that to be appro- 
priately dressed does not l>oost 

morale! 

Much of the credit for the suc- 
cess of the presentation should 
go to Norman Hurrle for his ac- 
companiments. Soft as thistle- 
down, strong as steel, they bore 

up soloist and chorus to a vic- 
torious finish. 

Being in the choruses, ! cannot 
judge their' effectiveness, except 
to xiy that everyone was de- 
termined to do credit to our con- 
ductor, and we were told that we 
accomplished this, for which we 
were thankful. We did, ns n 

choir, however, feel the real 
esprit de corps which goes to 
the making of n real choir, and 
we had reached the point where 
we listened for each other and 
endeavored to blend our voices 



with our neighliors*. 

We were fortunate in having 
outstanding soloists. From the 
re-assuring, "Comfort Ye", very 
finely rendered by Mr. Gardham, 
tenor, of Toronto, through the 
tremendous "I Will Shake", giv- 
en with feeling and power by 
Kenneth Morion, bass, on to the 
joyous, "O Thou that Tellest n , 
given with all its joy by Ma lie 
Jackson, contralto, then to 
*Thcre Were Shepherds" and the 
following recitatives which were 
given a fine interpretation by 
Elizabeth Beer, mezzo-soprano, 
and then the triumphant "Re- 
joice Greatly" sung by Alice 
Rourkc, soprano, with a splendor 
of tone mid a joyousness that 
surely was what the composer 
visualized. 

These tilings struck us par- 
ticularly: Mr. Hurrlc's beautiful 
interpretation of the Overture 

and Pastoral Symphony; the 
tenderness of Mnire Jackson's 
"He Shall Feed His Flock"; the 
understanding one felt in Eliza- 
beth Beer's solos; the joyousness 
of Alice Rourke's solo; and the 
fine perception displayed by the 
two tnnle soloists. 

We could not but feel that the 
choir excelled itself in "For Unto 
Us A Child is Born" »nd the 
"Hallelujah Chorus". 

It is good to see that the pre- 
cedent set by Queen Victoria 
that all shall rise for that mag- 
nificent paean of praise is still 
followed. 

Next week: Christmas Sunday 
and Christmas Eve. 



• 



- - 




*-— ----- . 





by I»nuljn> Boy 




mil v?. ,'i 1 Tr* }$fe*#° a '""'-"KW. KlSillias Kir) or homo- 

* r - , v ,i H ,r ''V 1 ' 18 1 l "* 1 ' |,l "'' . il ,' *«mm bsmmii m»mt^ 

&h» ..' y C ;™i 1 ^ I,,r ' d "! r&u * ftl "« ">«"'«y «° » "«»•». Much no «l 

rcKtXfuioii lor tired nnd iflj-'gcd 

flltinla is i* job for Dm bedroom. 

Mi comfort r-Iiituld lie emuidered 

when yiiu fold the throe* of re- 

lUi-ornlifig coming un. 

IMnful Him* for 
ftribrcunilliiR 

When urdcroriuuig keep in 
mind ttint the awnio rules tJirit 
yon npidy in dressing yourself 
to look Miiiimcr or heavier, 
shorter or tidier hold Rood in 
nu-mnn ft room. Vertical lines 
lengthen the arcn they rover, 
""ruofttid lines widen. Billowy, 
nmlcd Mirfufos rover iinglcs and 
iilnm dull upots und add Ixwrty. 
Will, Hinped and cheeked fabrica 

iiiake fur tmlorrd decoration, 
hfteeri *>ft and flcwer-print ma- 
leriab are more feminine. Ah 
for comfort — Dmt's n "must" 
in even tho wmptrst bedroom. 
At ierwt t>uo softly cushioned 

chiur, iw comfortable a inattreaa 

*u i you cau afford ? dreauog table witfc «©d li«ht and a matcWna cushioned 

«ool at the right height-all then *4 to your weJM*m«. T* W^ " 1 










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paper r^uhUai l**JM KoTwMl 



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AYLMER FANCY CORN 
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DOMESTIC SHORTENING 
FflflRGENE MARGARINE regular 
NHLSONS COCOA S 
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'•• 



By Caboune Ion 

j ■ - 

Every newspaper has its share of errors. Every 

:.-■■ columnist feeling responsible not only for what he writes 

v but also for how it finally appears in print shudders at 

those typographical errors which crop up occasionally. 






'In some instances, the result- 
ing article makes for more hu- 
morous reading than had origin- 
ally been planned. More often 
it unfortunately spoils the story. 

The Garden County News, a 



ber that It happens in 'the best 
of columns and in the most em- 
harassing situations. 

Why, in the Era and Express 
this past year, we recall an inter- 
esting account regarding a local 



weekly newspaper, admitted re- 1 wedding. The last paragraph 
cently to a rather bad week. In I dealt with methods of controlling 



the following issue it said, 
"Among the mistakes we made 
last week: Closed Munson's cafe 
when it should have been open, 
set Bern Coulter's sale date on 



drowsiness. This was a "filler" 
used to cover the space between 
the wedding account and the 
next news item. Unfortunately, 
no space was left between the 



the 10th when it should have I wedding story and the filler, 
been the 18th, set the Grant Readers* imaginations must have 



Dairy sale for the 39th when it 
should have been the 9th, gave 
Raymond Schrnid's son to Lloyd 
Schmid and put him in the wrong 
grade, gave the lots Ross Jack- 
son purchased to D. L. Jenson, 
put a story about the Lewellen 

(Neb.) preschool mothers in 

Kowanda items and spelled 

paragraph 'aragpra&hV Yes, it 
was rather a bad week at that. 

Frank B. Gilbreth, Jr., in his 
latest book, *Tm A Lucky Guy," 
tells of a few incidents which oc- 
curred while working on the 

newspaper at the University of 
Michigan during his student 
days. He had been assigned to 
cover the Dean's Office. Having 
been warned that he must be 
positively accurate about all 
stories relating to the Dean, Mr. 
Gilbreth was very careful, to fol- 
low his instructions to the letter. 
One day when he called at the 
Dean's Office, he found him in 
very poor humor and was told 



been kindled with the picture 
created. There was the bride 
radiant in her beautiful gown 
coming down the aisle with her 
father while the guests to right 
and left munched on lumps of 
sugar . . . the suggested cure for 
the drowsiness. 



* - a 

Uffs m Tip ii Ann 

Another tie cropped up in the 
Aurora Saturday morning pee- 
wee Allen Cup hunt It was Chi- 
cago and Canadiens 1-1. In the 
other contest the Leafs wound 
up their 1951 activity with a 2-1 
win over Detroit. Leaf victory 
moved them into undisputed 
possession of first place. 

Ever-ready sharp-shooter Don. 
Glass nipped in for the Chicago 
tally. Charles Vrana let fly 
with the Canadien's countering- 
blast. Glen- Bennett was the 
Leafs prize packet, counting 
both their goals. Gary Chapman, 
an up-and-coming young hockey 
laddie, nipped in and around the 
Leaf rear-guard to rack up the 
Detroiters* only date with the 
score-keeper. 

The bantam division of the 
Saturday morning league will 

likely get underway in earnest 
in two or three weeks, reports 
Bill MiradeU. 

It'll be a four team loop. Four 

sets of sweaters, being purchased 

by the Aurora Canadian' Legion, 

Rotary Club, Lions Club and the 

arena are now on order. 

W L T Pts 

4 1 2 10 

3 2 2 8 

12 4 6 

14 2 4 



- 



" ------ r- 



. 










, 






- 



* ■ ■ 






i . 






-.- r 



'■■:.• V-.V" 



Quiet week for the five-pin- 
ners. Only one league reported 
regular activity last week. That 
was the Thursday night ladies, 
operating at Joe Smith's alleys. 
Edna McGrath closed up the 
1951 season on the right note, 
hitting for a 636 to pace the 
scoring. Audrey Holme regis- 
tered a nifty 606. five hundred 
bracket scorers were Myrt Dunn 
532, Bessie Wonch 517, Emma 
Broadbent 512, Faye Struthers 
506, Norma Peel 504. 



[months at the Brown-Brymer 
North End Alleys. Ladies* win- 
ner was Vera Scott (Aurora) 
with a 717 (213-234-270). Peter 

Marx (Bradford Marsh) ran up 
an amazing 981 (349-216-416) to 
| capture the men's trophy. 
There's some score td beat, boys 
arid girls. 



Leafs 
Detroit 

Chicago 

Canadiens 



Some very fancy scores were 
needed to win the Clock Trophies 
offered over the past couple of 



rM>', 




News Of The WJ. 



News tut thii cohmm rcu* V* In lb* office Monday 
eight Copy zniutf be writt« u briefly m pontile and 

confined to news and reports. Other than routine 
■ad announcement* will be printed separately. 



to by Mrs. F. Stevens. Roll call 
is a v/ritten recipe for a first 

there was no news that morning! \ course^one-disb meal. Convener 

After a few inquiries, Mr. Gil- 



branch will meet at open. The ladies presented Mrs. 
the home of Mrs. W. Anderson ■ AmM witn a card tab!e and 
on Tuesday, Jan, 8. Motto: "Take • * « •« V« 

pains with your meals and you ornament as a farewell gift. All 

will never take pains after- w *sh her the very best in her 

wards." Motto is to be replied new home. 

Mrs. H. Walker gave an amus- 
ing reading on Christmas giving. 



; 



l 



1 



breth learned that the Dean had 
a sore back which^ccounted for 
his present mood. The Dean told 
him that the previous evening 
•he had tried to open a window 
in his office whirh had keen 
stuck since spring. When forcing 
it open.tf£ forf hurt his back. 

Nfceomg something for a story, 
Gilbreth decided to make 
a short note of the Dean's acci- 
dent. He was amazed upon re- 
turning to his residence follow- 
ing the printing of the paper to 
be greeted with slaps on the 
back and merry chuckles from 
his fellow fraternity brothers. 

Finally, so many comments 
were made regarding his story in 
the paper that he got a copy and 
read it . . . "The dean was re- 
cuperating last night from a 
strained back suffered when he 
attempted to force a widow in 



for home economics is Mrs. Er- 
win Winch. Hostesses are Mrs. 
W, Anderson, Mrs. R. Stiles and 
Mrs. D. Davidson. 



Snowball branch met at the 
home of Mrs. F. W. Browne on 
Thursday of last week for the 
Christmas meeting, with 12 
members and 14 guests present 

«_- «.,.- ,. . .r -i •• . . .-■-, The president, Mrs. H. Patrick, 
^Brv Gilbreth decided to make opened the meeting with the ode, 

followed by the Mary Stewart 

collect. The roll call: "Name 

your favorite color." 

Thank-you notes were read 
from those who received Christ- 
mas boxes. Eighteen Christmas 
boxes were sent to shut-ins, and 
those over 75 years of age. 
Members promised to take all 
discarded Christmas cards to the 
home of Mrs. R. Cain, where 
Mrs. Browne will pick them up 
and deliver them to the Mildmay 
nursery school. A beautiful 
.,; lt - rr* -- candy merry-go-round made by 

his office. The injury, while Mrs. Browne is to go to the Old 
painful, was not serious and he Ladies' Home at Newmarket, 
was able to go about the regular 



Mrs. Clarkson Arnold had many 
hints on gift wrapping. Several 
Christmas carols were sung and 
the meeting closed with the 
King, followed by a social half 
hour. At the close of the meet- 
ing the ladies packed Christmas 
boxes for the shut-ins. 



School Leape Opens 

The biggest-little hockey loop, 
the Newmarket Public Schools 
Hockey League, will spring into 
action Saturday morning. 

Present plan is to run eight 
teams as in past years. They will 
rje divided into squirt and pee- 
wee four-team groupings. 

Squirt-age players are 8 and 
9, while pee- wee age group are 

10 and II year olds. Kick-off of 
this active circuit is 9 a.m. Sat- 
urday morning. As yet, the 

selection of various players for 

the teams has not been complet- 
ed. Coaches and team names 
will he available for publication 
next week, also a complete 
schedule. 



At the moment at the North 
End Alleys, Ruth Blackwell of 
the Bradford Ladies' League has 
the inside track on the Bradlng's 
Trophy — offered for high single 
mark over the season in league 
competition— with a 284. Art 
Flanagan* Davis Leather league 
shot-maker, registered a 355 
single game recently to head the 
men's division. 



Floyd Cunningham (Queens, 
viile) was appointed manager of 
the Queensville arena last week. 
Despite the few days of mild 
weather, there's over an inch of 
ice in the arena and rink activi- 
ties are beginning to get into 
full stride. Skating is planned 
for two nights a week, Wednes- 
day and Saturday evenings. 

It is hoped to organize a 
hockey league along the lines of 

the successful Lake Simcoe 
Hockey League of two seasons 
ago. Another feature at the 
Queensville arena will be the 
East Gwillimbury school league. 
Plans are now being ironed out 
to get the school league rolling 
in the near future. 



* ■ 



v ; 



fflrfm 



Leagues all swing back info 

full stride again this week and 
next and a pause here to wish all 
the bowling fraternity a good 
1952. May your scores be so 
high Joe Smith and the Brown- 
Brymer combination will have to 
purchase an adding machine to 

keep track of them. 



The Newmarket Era And Express, Friday, Jamury I, INS raft) * 



■ * 



LADIES AID MEET 

The regular monthly meeting 
of the Sr. Ladies Aid of the 
Christian Baptist church will be 
held at the home of Mrs. Wilfred 

Traviss, Botsford St.* on Thurs- 
day, Jan. 10, at 2.30 p.m. 



JR. LADIES MEET 

The Junior Ladies' Aid, Chris- 
tian Baptiat church, Newmarket, 
will meet at the home of Mrs. 
Vera CodIc, Stmcoe St., on Tues- 
day, Jan. 8, at 8 p.m. A full at* 
tendance is requested. 



• 



■ 



Over 100 mass burial pits have 

been found in the Huronia dis- 
trict of Ontario, some of them 
containing over 200 Huron In- 
dian skeletons. 

Agriculture and tourism have 
much in common. Success of 
each depends on good weather 
and on individual enterprise by 
individual operators. 



Offer Pee-Wee Cup 

Harold "Red" Boyle, ex-Oak 
Ridges defenseman when the 
blood-thunder Aurora Town 
League was in full swing, and 
Fred Judges, star Ridges sup- 
porter in the* good old days, were 
so pleased with the twin-bill 
pee-wee attraction in Aurora on 
Wednesday that they want to see 
it carried on from year to year 
and are putting up a cup for an- 
nual competition. 

The cup they have in mind is 

an old Aurora Town League cup 
which they will have replated 

and retouched. Only stipulation 
by the donors is that the cup can 
only be played for by district 

teams, Aurora, Newmarket, Oak 
Ridges, Richmond Hill and other 
near-by pee-wee teams. 



OOWN THE CENTRE by a*hui» 



i , T 



I 



' V 



.1 




Hespeler juniors who won the 



performance of his duties." (Sec 
what we mean about those typo- 
graphical errors.) 

After that experience, Mr. Gil- 
breth, co-author of ""Cheaper By 
The Dozen 1 ', and "Belles On 
Their Toes", made a practice of 
calling in at the newspaper of- 
fice in time to check his column 
for such errors. This practice 
paid dividends a few months 
later, when a wealthy member 
of the university's Board of Re- 
gents was a guest of the dean. 
The regent, who was expected 
to leave the university a large 
endowment fund, was accom- 
panied by his blond, six-year-old 
granddaughter, the light of his 
life. 

"J recorded the visit In tha 
Daily/' writes Mr. Gilbreth, "re- 
ferring to the granddaughter as 
'towheadedV jj came out 'two- 
headed', hut v/e made a quick 
correction on i the press, so no 
harm was done." 



The Mount Albert branch will 
hold their January meeting in 
the I.O.O.F. hall oh Thursday, 
Jan. 10. Hostesses: Mrs. B. Sin. 
clair, Mrs. M. Oldham, Mrs. K. 
Mitchell. Roll call: a wise say- 
ing of our parents. History of 
our post office and current 
events. Conveners: Mrs. A. Har- 
rison*, Mrs. R. Harrison. 



A Christmas present of 200 
oranges, 200 apples and several 
scrap books and neckties was ta- 
ken to the Ontario Hospital, Au- 
rora, a few days before Christ- 
mas by our president, Mrs. N. 
Sproule from the members of 
King Ridge branch. 

The January meeting will be 



. ,, , , held at the home of Mrs. J. Ball 

Ten dollars was donated to the on Tuesday> JafL 8- at 8 pm 

Greek relief fund. A euchre Ifoslcsscs: Mrs . Q . J. Bertram! 
was planned for the evening of 

Jannuary 22. 



.^- - 



Mrs. Ed Reddick read a paper 
on "Line and Design," with Mrs. 
R. Cain and Mrs. Wm. Blum as 
models. 

Mrs. Wm. Davidson and Mrs, 
L. Hall gave a demonstration of 
Christmas decorations. Several 
of the school children then enter- 
tained us. Lois Farren, Shiela 
Davidson, Cora Morning and 
Margaret Barr sang; Barbie 
Blum recited and Karen and 
Dale Farren sang. Cora Morn- 
ing and Ranald Fowler gave a 
dialogue. Lois Farren, Cora 
Morning, Margaret Barr and 
Susan Blum did a pantomime. A 
lovely lunch followed. 



* - 



The December meeting of the 
Zephyr branch was held in the 
community hall on Wednesday 
afternoon, Dec. 19, with 25 ladies 
present. It was decided to have 
otiir annual banquet, which is 
During the coming months usual| y held- in the hall in Janu- 
""- - " ' ary, elsewhere, and four ladies 

were nominated to enquire about 
accommodation. Further notice 
later. 

Mrs. A. Arnold, who has been 
our secretary for some years, re- 
signed, and the position is still 



when in our articles we have 
occasion to refer to your small 
son as a "twoheaded darling" or 
report such indiscretions as the 
forcing of a widow (or was it a 
window) in your office, remern- 



and 'Mrs. II, Parker. Motto: "Be 
not simply good, but good for 
something". Roll call: "A New 
Year's Resolution." 



Sharon branch will hold a pro* j 
gressive euchre and cribbage 
party at Sharon Hall on Tuesday, 
Jan. 8. Playing will start at 8.15 
p.m. Good prices will be given. 
Come and bring someone with 
you. 



The King branch will meet at 
the home of Mrs. Wells McDon- 
ald, Jan. 8, at 8.15 sharp. The 
topic will be Associated Country 
Women of the World, an organ- 
ization of country women, with a 
membership of about 6,000,000 
members, spread over 103 organ- 
izations, and living in 23 differ- 
ent countries. It is the only or- 
ganization of its kind in the 
world. Members are urged to 
attend the first meeting **f the 
New Year. Committee: Mrs. 
McDonald, Mrs. K. Bice, Mrs. B. 
J. f^angdon, Mrs, Davidson, Mrs. 
K. J. Armstrong and Mrs. L. E. 
Rolling. Be prepared to respond 
to the roil call "Say, Sing or 
Pay." 




: 



f ~ 



I 



U-- 



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* 






■ i 



O05MG HOURS FOR WINTER AT 

lELL'S'-CORN 

nMMiy 

Tinaby, WednesAy and Ttasda, 

Friday and Sahrday 

Sondav 



Closed 



pjt 



1.00 







. 



Kmx^ 













n 






I 









- i 

Our private dininj? room will be opened any day if reserved in 
advanw. IU clean, comfortable atmosphere, large enough to seat 25 
guests (50 with coffee shop) is ideal for that 

BRIDGE PARTY 

BIRTHDAY PARTY 

AFTERNOON TEA 

WEDDING or FORMAL BANQUET 

I 

% 

Meals served to your order 









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;:-■■ 



P -Y-'tl 




O.H.A. junior "D" championship 
last season, defeating Nohleton in 
the finals, will be the visitors at 
Aurora arena on Friday night, 
and while the Hespeler kids have 
lost one or two players, another 
chiller-thriller game should be 
produced for the fans by Aurora 
Bears. 

That Noblefon same last Fri- 
day was not the highest class 
hockey you'll see, and both teams 
made plenty of mistakes, but we 
can't recall ever seeing one like 
it in these parts. A new record 
for Aurora arena was established 
when five goals were sent past 
Howie Pcterman in the Aurora 
nets in a mere matter of 74 sec- 
onds. It was all done while 
master Walt. Fines, Aurora de- 
fenceman who played a master- 
ful game on defence, was in the 
hoosegow for a somewhat cheap 
penalty meted out by referee 
Keen Smith. 

Aurora, of course, via Bobs 
Cook and Grant Winters, put two 
in the net, but try as they would, 
they couldn't get the puck out 
past the blucline and Noel Ash 
and Bruce Wallace made no mis- 
takes in close. The fans were 
regtisted not only at the penalty, j 
but at the play of the Bears and 
rightly so. It was a poor dis- 
play, and worst of all, some of 
the lads were laughing about it 
all. 

It was Andy Closs, playing a 
great defensive game, hut as yet 
unable to untrack himself, who 
pulled the team out of the dol- 
drums as with two men short, 
Aurora scored. Andy didn't get 
the goal but he set up the play, 
and did some swell forcchccking 
and backchecking. That made it 
7-2, and Aurora added a couple 
more, but at the end of the sec- 
ond stanza the 7 - 4 score looked 
mighty good for Nobleton. 

The fans were still a bit mif- 
fed but shaking their heads as 
they thought of those two gift 
goals, but somewhat satisfied that 
the team would m a k e a good 
showing. The roof fell in on 
Nobleton, who played short three 
players, as they nonchalantly 
watched the Bears draw close 
and then wilted under a sus- 
tained power drive. Bobs Cook 
got the nicest goal of the night 
on a breakaway. Seven in one 
period made It 11 - 7 at the end 
and it might have been more. 

Johnny Weedon played a nice 
game in the nets for Nobleton 
and couldn't be blamed for the 
loss. If Aurora had kept Weedon, 
Woods, and Noel Ash last season 
when they had them they would 
have won the M li" championship. 
The addition of this trio would 
he helpful now the cluh has been 
rated as Junior C. The fact Au- 
rora won 11 - 7 Is no indication 
the team is "C" by rating. Char- 
lie Rowntree has to have one or 
two more players if he's going 
to go places, A right winger, a 
left winger, and one defonceman 
who can bash them down* are 
badly needed, and oil with a lit- 
tle weight. 

Coaching from the sidelines is 
easy, we suppose, hut we thought: 
Pepper Martin might go to bet- 
ter advantage at centre; Don 
Mwnshaw is not back-checking 
and will have to pull up the 
slack offensively as well; Bob 
Hanna while willing and Improv- 
ing is too slow to leave on de- 
fence when the. club is short- 
handed; Elmo Phillips still has 
that bad habit of playing the 
puck too lightly and finding it 
on the opponent's stick. Ho 
needs to fire from further out so 
the wings can get in, in place of 
passing just at the Wuclinov 

The whole team still wastes 
time going back in their own ter- 
ritory, especially carrying around 
behind the net. In answer to 
what you're thinking, "we never 
laid an egg, but we can tell a 
bad one when wo see it." Aban- 
donment of the red line Is cer- 



tainly a big improvement and 



certainly there was more centre 
ice play than in any game we've 
seen in a few moons. 

The refereeing wasn't as good 
as "Smitty" can do, but Noble- 
ton plays a rugged brand of 
hockey, and certainly the type 
of hockey was better to watch 
than that against Elmira and Bol- 
ton. It certainly steamed up the 
fans, which makes for a rousing 
contest and increased gates. No 
one can ever question the fact 
that Mr. Smith knows the rules, 
and is totally impartial. Could 
be we are wrong but we thought 
he started to blow on some of 
the plays that deserved a penalty, 
but was too slow, and then blew 
for infractions which, while in 
the book, were less noticeable. 
Both players and officials have 
their bad days, and in the east- 
ern junior "B" circuit, "Smitty" 
is well liked, and for that matter, 
in the Big Five. 

Incidental items: Paul Magulre 
is hack in Lindsay and the regu- 
lar netminder for Red Mitchell. 
Seems strange to think the Bears 
could have kept him here and 
didn't. The misunderstanding 
might well have been cleared up. 
We're not criticising Joey Burke 
or Pcterman but after all, Ma- 
guire has had a year in 4, C", one 
in "B" and is able to go out and 
win his spot back again, with 
practically no practice. 

Eddie Williams has joined the 
Union ville defence, and he's do- 
ing better than last year with 
Aurora Bears. When Orillia 
comes to town, catch a glimpse of 
Red Sanderson, who still has two 
years in junior. Coach Clayt 
French made no mistake in ele- 
vating the youngster. He's one 
of the best. 

Bert Barber, president of the 
Richmond Hill Curling Club, an- 
nounces they've a sheet of ice, 
and will welcome all their old 
friends from these parts once 
again. Grant Green, who was 
with Aurora juniors in "C", is a 
regular on defence with Lindsay 
Muskies who arc in the O.II.A. 
intermediate "A" ranks ni.u 
doing well. Harry Mftlroy, i*x- 
Sutton Greenshirts and Markham 
is back again along with brother 
Ken Milroy for Highland Creek 
in the rural series. 

How come mat Fergus juniors, 
who rate as junior "D" and were 
the reasons and persons behind 
the elevating of Aurora Bears 
to junior "C" status, are allowed 
to draw players from "C" towns? 
Messrs. Wilson and Closs, to their 
credit, are not thinking of com- 
plaining about this, hut there are 
those within the group who may. 
Chickens generally come home to 
roost or squawk. 

Kettlcby has folded In the 

Nobleton circuit and they're 
seeking a berth in the Aurora 
Town league. Too late and it'd 
make the loop lopsided, sez Proxy 
Jim Murray. 

Ten years ago, in the S.P.A. 
series, Newmarket juniors were 
defeated by St. Mike's Buzzers 
and Frank Gregolre, sports mas- 
ter at Aurora high, was a mem- 
ber of the Buzzers. The New- 
market club was composed of: 
goal, Pete Kalis; defence, Tommy 
Meyers and Cliff Gunn; forwards, 
Merv Broughton, Stan Gibbons, 
Myles Melnnis, the late Jack 
I.uek, Bill Jcltey, Bob Dixon, 
Howard Hamilton, and Whltey 
Bono. If we recall rightly, "Ho- 
ney" had to he dropped during 
the season by the age route, and 
Alfio Watson and Bruce Towns- 
ley joined the cluh, along with 
Frank Carr. Markham however 
won the group. Actually of that 
entire crowd, Myles Melnnis is 
the only one you can say ]s act- 
ively engaged In hockey. The 
war at course brought to a close 
the career of some of them. 

others moved away, and the rest 
dropped to bush league hockey 

or retired. 

Charlie Smith, better known 



as "can't win", once the ace of 
Canadian jockeys and rider of 
Ten to Ace in the King's Plate 
triumph of 191*1, has been visit- 
ing his mother and relatives in 
Aurora over the holiday season. 
Charlie still looks trim enough to 
ride a winner, and he's still in 
the New England states and in- 
terested in racing, this time from 
the business end. Hopes to be 
back up in Canada next summer. 

Good news indeed to learn that 
Bill Wilkinson is living out of 
hospital and will soon be ready 
for a business post that he's been 
promised in Aurora once he's fit. 
The Wilkie fund is still in exis- 
tence in case you've forgotten 
and Ralph Tucker, newly elected 
Aurora alderman, or Brick Heat- 
on at the Aurora Imperial will 
take a donation. 

Retirement came at year's end 
to H, M. "Mac" McKenaie, man- 
ager for many years of the Im- 
perial Bank at Aurora. "Mac" 
is a great golfer and one of the 
stalwarts of the Highlands Club 
and with leisure on hand, he 
should be able to beat his cronies 
consistently. In the winter time, 
it's cards, and hockey matches - 
he's a great fan, and for several 
years he was officially connected 
with the Aurora junior hockey 
club. Might be able to pep-up 
the Arena Commission of which 
he's a member. Good luck in 
future "Mac". 



* - : 




SPORTS COLUMI 






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serin 



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$u±< -■;-■ 



mean the' 



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. fir' '--V? *-' ; -X'V 

— msasifllil sportsmen wb* 

of Jfuj^ sporl&manshlp. We mean tke 
ermeii : pho would worn to take an 

limit 



winee of fish over •_ .. e „ _„ m «„„. ww „ cu ^ 
fish were filling. Or trie hunter who would never think U 
shoot a bird, or a deer, or anything tlse ont of season. Tlie 
golfer who wontd rather add than subtract a stroke from 
his score in case of doubt. The good losers- The sportsmen. 

These come in all divisions of sport, amateur and pro- 
fessional, in all games. And one of the finest displays of 
courage and sporting spirit was given two years ago by Bill 
Durnan, rated by many the greatest net-minder of alt time, 
when just after he had completed his sixth Vezina Trophy 

victory in seven seasons, he stepped aside, in the midst of 
the 1950 Stanley Cup series, to be replaced by a comparative 
rookie, because he was convinced his continued stay in the 
nets was unfair to his own club. 

Never before have we known, in a long association with 
hockey, of a top-ranking player, rated the world's He«t in 
his position, suddenly deciding that he wasn't good enough 
to carry on, feeling that some greatness, some reflex, has 
suddenly failed him, and voluntarily stepping down, to hand 
over the job to a comparative neophyte. 

It's an epic of fine sporting spirit, of team loyalty. And 
someone of more gifted pern who can analyse ami describe 
such mental torments and conflicts eould f Inct : ineS^te 
material for a compelling story of eonfllctitMl emotions, of 
the hours of troubled thought Durnan must have given t* 
his own problem, a problem he had to solve himself, with 
no outside help. Because, to a man at the top of his pro- 
fession, a man with Intense pride of eraft, it represents 
tremendous athletic and moral sacrifice that suddenly he 
must say to the world: "I think I'm through. 1 cant carry 
on. 1 want a younger man to take my place." 



■ - 



■■el 




* - 



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i 



Durnan told coach Dick Irvin: "I'm not playing up to 
the mark, Dick. My vision hasn't been really good since 
that accident in Chicago. Something has happened to my 
reflexes, to my nerves. It isn't fair to the boys that I 
should carry on. We've lost three straight, and I don't feel 

that my nerves are capable of going in there for o fourth 

game." j 

Irvin was amazed. He told Durnan to sleep on it, think 
it over. But the next morning, as the players went out for 
a light skate, prior to the game that night, Durnan didn't 
attempt to dress. 

So Irvin sat down, told young Gerry McNeil exactly 
what had happened. McNeil listened, nodded, started to 
dress. Then he stopped. "No," he said. "I cant do this. 
Bill is too fine a guy to have anyone push him out right in 
the Cup series. I won't do it." 

But Durnan rose to this problem too. Preaching team 
loyally, he sold his own Job to McNeil, settled his own 
problem* 

What problem? someone might enquire. That someone 
wouldn't of course, be very close to the sports picture, nor 
Would that someone understand what pride of eraft, what 
learn loyalty means 46 those who achieve the higher brac£|||^ 
in part because they possess those very attributes. 



~\ - 



Your cnmmtft! « and iwogerifens for f hit totumn wf" oewefcomed 
by Btmer Ferguion, c/o CarVeVf Koine, 431 Yonge Sf. # Toronto. 




K - 



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DISTILLERS LIMITED 



AMHEftSTBUIG, ONTAftIO 



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Now, At Last, We Can Reduce Our 



PRICES 



$ Is Nm Able To Offer 
You the Same TOP QUALITY Over- 

* 

coats As In The Past But With PRICE 



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REDUCTIONS Of 



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20 to 60 percent 






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Off Our Regular Prices Of $55 to $89 






HERE IS YOUR OPPORTUNITY TO SAVE 



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WITHOUT SACRIFICING QUALITY 

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Morrison's Men's Wear 

Phone 158 Main St. 



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Bruce Hall'* King Maroons, 
surprise package of the 1*31 
King-Vaugban Hockey League 
battles, kept alive their unbeaten 
skein last week, using a four- 
goal last period upsurge to nose 
out Kleinburg 5-4. 

In the other contest, the help- 
less Kettleby "Grcenshirts~ Tell 
prey to Schorobexg's re-surging 
scoring punch 9-4. The Bergers 
sewed it up with a five-goal sec- 
ond period. 

Third contest of the week saw 
Nobleton connect for undisputed 
possession, one point up on King, 
of first place with a 7 - 3 win 
over Bolton Wanderers, 

King Maroons allowed Klein- 
burg to build a 4 - 1 edge before 
getting active in the final period- 
King defenseman Loring Doo- 
little was great. He fired three 
third period goals including the 
game winner. Ross Folliott snip- 
ed for the tying marker and John 
Richards blasted in King's first 
period get-away tally. Kleinburg 
marksmen were Don Milliard, 
Walt Bell, Murray Billiard and 
Willard Rice. 

— w h m —f 

It was a scoring evening for 



Don Mat-chant as Schomberg 
conked Kettleby. Don, making 
his first appearance in several 
games, slammed in four goals and 

added an assist for good measure. 
The* bkmde Schomberg whiz-kid 
almost took care of Kettleby sin- 
gle-handed but accepted scoring 
help from Murray Edwards two, 
Bud Brown, Bill Winters ajtf 
Howie Archibald one each. Bill 

Breedon moved in to aid the 
weakened Schomberg defense 
corps and Bob Kearns came up 
with a neat goal-tending chore. 
Bill Gillham racked up a first 
and third period goal to spear- 
head the basement sunk Kettle- 
by's. Dougie Munshaw and Ted 
Rogers poked in a goal apiece- 

Tom Dwyer, Stan Foster- and 
Jack Woods, Nobleton's triple- 
threat, goal-hungry threesome, 
fogged the scoring' spotlight as 
Nobleton spilled Bolton 7-3 for 
win sis: of the campaign. Dwyer 
counted three, Foster and Woods 
two each. Ted Derbyshire fired 



tB 




*» 



HASH 

•y George Haskett 






More and more, this corner is beginning to cotton 
to the idea of a Bush League play-off for the North 

York championship. 



HASHMAN AWARD 



■ 






:" 



. ... - :- 



- - 






NOTICE 

The management of the Hol- 
land Landing Santa Claus Far- 
rade committee wish to thank 
all those, who so kindly donat- 
ed prizes to aid our Parade 
Fnnd, also those who entered 
floats and helped in any way. 

*, EARL ATKINSON, 
-■- :v Sec.-treas. 



Suppose each league, by that 
we mean King-Vaughan, Stouif- 
ville, Aurora Town League and 
Newmarket and District circuits, 
toss five bucks into a kitty. They 
purchase a pennant inscribed 
North York "Amateur" Hockey 
Champions- Winner of the series 
could hang the pennant In its 
home arena. It could be used 
£rom year to year. How's it 
sound? 

Most of the teams this corner 

has had a chance to discuss the 

proposition with are heartily in 
accord with the idea. No trouble 
about ice either as all four arenas 







Harvey Wallace, Bolton's 
speeding front liner, has taken 
over the top roost in the King- 
Vaughais Hockey League scoring 
race. Latest statistics on the 
scoring race, issued by Bill Bree- 



* 


G 


A 


Pts 


Wallace (Bol) 


9 


5 


14 


Woods (Nob) 


5 


8 


13 


Dwyer (Nob) 


10 


2 


12 


Foster (Nob) 


6 


6 


12 


Ham (King) 


5 


5 


10 


Derbyshire (Bol) 


5 


4 


9 


(Doolittle (King) 


5 


4 


M 




BRADFORD, ONTARIO 



THURSDAY TO SATURDAY 

' • ' - "Two Tickets to 

Tony Martin, Janet Leigh 
SECOND FEATURE 




' 4 * 




m mmm *mm mm 

S^MONDAIT TO WEIWESfiA* 

"LUUABY i 



- Jm -/_-J 




t 



-mmmmsD feature 

"FUUH BRUSH 6BL" 






.- 




Eddie Albert 



' ** 



flJESDAY NIGHT tg FOTO. NIGHT 




PHONE 478 NEWMARKET 

CONTINUOUS NIGHTLY FROM 7 TM. SAT. FROM 6 FvM. 
SATURDAY MATINEE AT Z FJkL 



Bolton's heavy artillery, count- . ,. , , . 

ing twice. Jack Gibson punched » S , f tron » ^/Z?* 7 ^^™' 

home a singleton. ^J** ? .** ^9^^' ^^ 

artificial ice. What s the next 

step in organizing, then? Simple. 

Gei the presidents of the four 

groups together and iron out tke 
wrinkles. Winner from each cir- 
cuit could play off or some seem 
to favor an all-star team from 
each. No matter - just so long 
as we can get cracking on the 
idea. 

Besides causing all kinds of 
post-season excitement the play- 
off sets could jam the arenas in 
question. To top it off, the 
teams, the leagues and the arenas 
could all fall heir to a few extra 
bucks to start off next year. 

While we're in a suggesting 
mood, why not hold the presi- 1 
dents* meeting soon ~ central jo- 
cation would be Aurora; Who'll 
start the ball rolling by suggest- 
ing date of the wrmMereJIminat- 
ing gathering? 

Around the rinks: Hockey, like 
the old grey mare, isn't what it 
used to be. High scoring games 
used to be tops at 7i ■*■$$_ '*--.$ 
or around that neighborhood. 

What do we see no\4% ' ^ (Goals 
popping in at an alarming ^ rate. 
Your scribe saw the fetf light' 
flashed 42 times in two game^in 
two nights last week. Spits wal- 
loped Bracebridge 19 - 5, Aurora 
Bears belted Nobleton 11:, * % 
breaking down that's a goal 
every three minutes. Nobletort 
plunked five goals in the Autor^ 
cage in a minute and four s$eH 
onds. _ 

Horace Brown and Perry 
Winch Jr. come along with a re*: 
port of a married men's hockey- 
league being organized at Kes- 
wick. Aurora created a little 
holiday week fun with a triple 
header attraction. It raised ?35 
to help purchase sweaters for 
one of Bill Mundeii's wee nipper 
hockey teams. . 

Your scribe deplores the fact 
that this type of activity appears 
to have faded completely from 
the local scene since the advent 
of artificial ice. Used to recall 



Twm Leaguers Resume 

Fresh as daisies from a three- 
week vacation, both the New- 
market and Aurora town leagues 
will go back to action stations 
next week. Vandorf Jets, pres- 
ent cellar occupants, and Harold 
CraddockV Office Specialty 
league leaders will provide the 
1952 send-off in the Newmarket 
sector. Big game of course will 
be the Mount Albert-Town . Re- 
gents clash with second place 
the prize. ' Games start at 7.30 

PJTL 

Aurora Town League will have 

its 1952 eye-opener Tuesday. 

Jim Murray's Hotelmeii, pres- 
ently occupying the basement, 

will tackle Cliff Chapman's 
Case's Aces is 52 curtain-raiser. 
Mickey Sutton's Dairy Ditch Dig- 
gers will take a belt at Victory 
Flyers in the late game. Latter 
contest will be-a battle for first 
place. Diggers have a one-point 
margin at present. 

All the Aurora teams will 
open the *52 campaign with nat- 
ty new sweaters. 



- 

Quickest Hot Trick 

Hai trick shows are notfciftt new in these days of soaped 
*p Meting around the hockey toshkms. Your B^m Qh i^ 
witnessed qmfte a few over Ifce years. Bat if oar memory is 
on ta» beam, we cant recall ever- rvnnina: across one bdnc 
perforated in one minute and four seconds* 



Ned "Nobbr" Ash well-known, well-liked chiten of Pine 
Orchard, now giving ont with his hockey ability for Kobleton, 
did Just that Friday night as Nobleton and Aurora Bears 
unreeled a Jim-dandy came to the delight of 600 roaring fans. 
Naturally we just can't let this kind of goings on escape without 
banding ont a citation even if it was performed against one 
of oar favorite teams. Therefore on the basis of M lhe fastest 
hat trick" we're naming Noel "Nobby" Ash as our first 1952 
H a shm a n award winner and Roxy Theatre pass recipient. 



Bush Thrown Out Of Game 
Takes Shipbuilders With Him 



H 



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_ 



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*4, 

?2* 



nJIS £*' Eddic! ™ cy ' r< ; stl " »">»» four, Bill Patrick thW 

using the same set of rules In Ken Brighton two, Al sK£ 

chufc, Don Smith, Harold Tun* 
stead arid Ken Thorns, one each.' 
Bracebridge^ top man was- 
Archie Ball with two. Stew ReidV 



Bears Trim Nobelton 



-v .- *.<>. 




Open Tuesday 



Newmarket juveniles will 
usher in their home O.M.H.A. 

hockey campaign next Tuesday 
against Little Britain. Game time 
te 8.45 p.m. Newmarket has 
been grouped with Port Perry, 
Beayertqn, Sutton, Keswick and 
Little Britain; 

i^ewmarket;is the lone B team, 
I&tKPerry has a Grating; The 
Other four teams are rated I>; 
'fi^presentatives of the: six teams 
gathered £t Stbuffville Sunday 
to draw up a group schedule. 
Present- at the Sunday meeting 
were ^gr^p) convener Jim Austin 
of Stbuffville, Bill Young and 



There was a lot of pinching 
being done around Pep Perry- 
meat's ice igloo Friday. The 

pinching was being done by Au- 
rora Bears disciples around 11 
chimes. They just had to pinch 
themselves to make sure they'd 
really seen it happen. 

But before putting this amaz* 
ing phase of the picture inw fo- 

cus, we'll tell you Aurora Bears 
defeated Nobleton 11-?. It mark- 
ed the fifth straight win for the 
Bears on their home cushion. 

Features galore: Number one 
was that during the second 
period, the Bears trailed 7-1. 
Practically anyone would have 
wagered the Bears were meas- 
ured for their first home loss. 
The Bears did stage a bit of a 
rally to nose up to 7-4 before 
time ran out in round two. It 
still appeared a terrific uphill 
fight to get back in the game. 

Coach Charlie Rowntree and 
Andy Closs, however, unlim- 
bered their ace pep talk between 
rounds and some 600 odd fans 
saw a flying Bear club run in 
seven goals without a reply from 
tired Nobleton band for an 11-7 
win. 

Feature two was >&• record- 
smashing five goals tipped into 
the Aurora net liny a; minute and 
four seconds by a piping hot 
Nobleton platoon. Ever-ready, 
steady defenseman Walt Fines 
was the unhappy pawn -ift the 
sudden Nobleton uprisings : He 

sat in sin-bin for a" two-mmute 

holding sentence while Nbble> 



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The O.H.A. executive sub-com- 
mittee aimed a year end kick at 

Aurora Bears. They announced 
last week that owing to Aurora's 

use of three players from New- 



'52 1 as in '51. A hockey game 
still consists of three, 20*min- 
ute periods. Ah well, it was a 
natural mistake to make, what 
with hockey rules changing so 
abruptly nowadays. 

"Game awarded to Newmar- 
ket." That's what referee Leon 
Smith of Sutton called out at 10 
minutes and 45 seconds of the 
second period of Collingwood 
vs. Newmarket last night. Here's 
what happened. Eddie Bush, 
"the people's choice to get lost", 
drew a five-minute major for 
crashing burly and rugged Jack 
Andrews into the boards. 

Eddie, never at a loss for a 
word, talked this into a 10-min- 
ute misconduct, and then a 
match misconduct which in a 
word, means out of the game. 
Previous to this, Jeffreys, the 
Collingwood man who turns the 
Shipbuilders loose oh the Ice, 
had been ousted from the game 
for over-stating a few things 
with Referee Smith. 

Collingwood wouldn't put a 
man in the box to serve out Ed- 
die Bush's major — so Referee 
Leon Smith had no choice but to 



market, Bob Hanna, Bob Forhan 

and Ken Burke, the Bears hence- 1 call It game— Newmarket's game" 

forth would be moved up into a C as^the Spits had nothing to do 
classification. 

Aurora would complete their 
schedule in the junior D group 
with Elmira, Fergus, Hespeler, 
Bolton and Nobleton, but on com- 
pletion of the regular group play, 
would advance to the O.H.A. C 
playdowns. Fergus club officials 
launched the protest that resulted 
in the O.H.A. boosting the Bears 
up the rating list. 

The O.H.A. decision didn't faze 
the Aurora executive or team as 
they went out and won over No- 
bleton Friday and as one execu- 
tive member remarked, "It may 
be a blessing in disguise as there 
are fewer C teams to take care 
of on the championship trail and 
we're absolutely sure of getting 
out of the group and into the 
playdowns under this ruling." 



Merv Robinson and Fred Nichols 
with singles. 

Myles Mclnnis was the Spits 
mg gun on the northern excur- 
sion. Myles put his trade mark 
on three goals, Bill Johnston 
drove in a single. The teams 
worked out of the first period 
tied two all. Bears went ahead 
4 - 2 in the second, Spits reju- 
venated in the final round to out- 
score the Bears 2 - 1 but fell one> 
short of the tying goal. 



HOW im STAND 

. Jan. 2, 1952 



Collingwood 

Stouffville 

Newmarket 

Midland 

Orlllia 



BIG FIVE SENIOR 

W L T 

6 3 

5 2 

3 I 1 

3 4 

16 1 




ket. 

Playing date of the Newmar- 
ket at Keswick game to complete 
the schedule is to be arranged for 
the week of Jan. 22 to 26. 

mm mam 



l^rni^AldricK of Beavertdh. 

Bohmer. ^Jinj^' . Groves is 
coaching the Joc^l entryj Fred 
Thompson Js: manager and ^ Bill 
Young; club presidehi The trio 
are hoping that fiifr fans will 
give; this year's team good sup- 
port; vNewmarftet ' will' haW a 
hptfie: game eacii-^esaay for 
the next five weeks before pro- 
ceeding into the OJ*HfA. B 
playdowns; .; : ^S vl 

Newmarket schedule: Jan. 4, 
Newmarket j|; jjattie Britain; 
Jan. 8, JJttle Britain at Newmar- 
ket; Jan. I0> Newmarket at Bea- 
verton; Jan. 15, Keswick at New- 
market; Jan. 18, "Newmarket at 
Port Perry; Jan. 22, Bcaverton 
at Newmarket; Jon. 29, Sutton at 

broom-ball tilts and cut-ups be- S^fi?* Jan - 3I ' »«"»**; 
tween east side. - west side to| FeD . 5 * P ort Per t Newmar . 
liven up the long winters and " - 
also put a little sock in some 
worthy charity. I^efs get *em 
going again. What say? 

Bill MeComb is back on his 
native soil. "Jointer" was with 
Indianapolis to start this season 
but Is now on the voluntary re- 
tirement list. At present he T s 
awaiting his amateur card before 
making a move. This is expect- 
ed through in the near; future. 
Little doubt he'd make a wel- 
come addition to our Spits when 
pthe tracks are cleared for his re- 
turn to- amateur hockey. 

Sad notes: Links with by-gone 
baseball and hockey days were 
severed this week hy the passing 
of Basil McHafe.and Geo. Robi- 
faille. Basil, old timers will re- 
call, pitched for the town team 
when the town baseball league 
flourished and later hurled good 
ball for Newmarket's tri-county 
entry. 

Geo. Robitaille, curling and 
howling enthusiast, managed the 
old arena that cluttered up the 
north end sky-line where Aub 
Rowland's garage now stands. 

Geo. had a knack - so old timers 
inform us - of making extra fine 
ice for curling and hockey in 

those by-gone days when the 
winters were longer and colder. 



Geo, Haskett; Newmarket> Ar^ {ton poured in their five Quickies, 
gfcie; McMasler, . fPoW Perry,* starting at 50 sees, and running 
*•* • • ~ through to 1.54. 



Noel "Nobby" Ash, Pine Or- 
chard fugitive, put a\rayotliree; 
and Bruce Wallace twoi Those 
super - fast markers combined 
with a 2-rl edge fashioned ; around 
Ash's first goal and one' by-Jacfc 
Woods built the invaders their 
7-1 edge. - ; "-.V.-~;-_ ;" : 

Aurora scorers were. Grant Ed- 
wards with three, Walt Tines 
two, Keith Colling^ [iwoy _Boo ; 
Forhan, Bobbs Cook, Elmo Pnik 
ips and Pepper Martin singles. 
Assist spotlight grabber^ w6te- 
Joe Gasko and Stew. Wilson, 
three each, Andy Closs and Boh 
Forhan, two apiece. 

Bear facts: Howard Peterman 
replaced Joe Burke in the Au- 
rora cage. Bears outshot Noble- 
ton who arrived with ten men 
by a 44-23 margin. The margin 
bulked large in the final period 
as the Bears outgunned the in- 
vaders 18-4. Biggest flare-up, in 
a well provisioned supply of el- 
bows and high sticks, came in 
the final minute. Grant Win- 
ters took two minutes for his 
part, Jim Patton two and ten. 



<•! 




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Brnfflfflit tmiCT ,vmns 



Momfay - Wednesday 

The Story Of 
A Great Detective 
Who Didn't Know 

He Was Trailing 

HisOwn 
Heartbreak! 



Jan.7-9 



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ADULT ENTERTAINMENT 



apWBr-; 




Keswick Loses 8-1 

Keswick's rural hockeyists 
winning skein is at an end end 
they're off on the wrong foot in 
'52, For these happenings they 
have to thank Kills Pringlc's Sut- 
ton "GreenshtHs" Prlnglc's tribe 
humbled Keswick Comets 8 - 1 
in the Keswick Arena Wednes- 
day, The game was a Trj-County 
Rural J Jockey J«eaguc scheduled 
contest. 

Keswick allowed Uieir arch 
rival from up the Sfmcoe shores 
to notch a first period 1-0 lead. 
That was had enough hut. when 
the Prln%le men proceeded to lord 
it over the Coinefs by a 4 - I 
margin in round two and rushed 
in another three in the finale, 
the Keswick goose was cooked. 

Gord Clark staved off the 
shame of a Keswick shut-out at 
7.02 of the second period accept- 
ing Jack Cole's lay-over pass to 
deke Hill Holder in the Sutton 
twinery. It was a nifty hit of 
work and the only regret from 
a Keswick angle was that there 
I weren't more of the same, 



Jan. 4, 6 imb,> Newmarket 
Arena, Optimists K.I1.I,. triple- 
header, Chicago vs Detroit, Ren- 
gera va Leafs, Canadlens vs 
Brains; 8.30 pjn. r Aurora Arena, 
Junior O.H.A., Uespeler vs Auro- 
ra Bears; 8 p.m f Nobleton Arena, 
King - Vaughan double - header, 

Nobleton vs Kleinburg, Bolton vs 

Schomberg; 8.3* p.m. Little Brl* 

tain Arena, Juvenile O.MJI.A., 

Newmarket Comets vs LitUe 
Britain; 

Jan. 5, *M a.m. Aurora Arena, 
Aurora Allen Cup, peewee ser- 
ies; 

Jan. 7, 7.30 p.m., Newmarket 
Arena, Newmarket and District 
twin-bill, Vandorf vs Specialty, 
Town vs Mount Albert; 8,34 pjn., 
Ifespeler Arena, Junior OJI,A*i 
Aurora Bears vs Hespeler. 

Jan. 8, 8.45 pjn., Newmarket 
Arena, Opening Game O.M.H.A., 
Juvenile, LHtle Britain at New- 
market; 8 pjn., Aurora Arena, 
Aurora Town League, twin-bill, 
Hotelmen vs Case's Aees, DJlch 
Olgjrers vs Flyers; 8.30 pm., 
Keswlek Arena, O.H.II.A. Rural, 
Ifaliburten vs Keswkk. 

Jan. 9, 8.30 p^n,, Nobleton 
Arena, KIng-Vaughan Hock 
League, Schomberg vs Kleinburg. 




Two in 0.M.H JL 



Aurora plans to enter two 
teams in the O.M.H.A. play- 
downs, reports assistant rccrcn- 
tion director Bill Mundcll. En- 
ties arc being forwaritod to cover 
bantam and midget teams. Dis- 
trict opposition in tamtam series 
appears to he lacking so it is 
likely Aurora will advance to 
the O.M.H.A. playdowns without 
opposition. 

In the midget division New- 
market and Keswick previously 
filled entries with the O.M.H.A. 
and Sutton are supposed to have 
drawn a bye into Ontario play- 
downs. It is hoped a four-team 
midget grouping of Aurora, New- 
market, Keswick and Sutton can 
be formed. 



: Keswiclc juveniles, entered in 
life Q.MiHiA. race, have been 
grouped with Sutton, lattle Bri- 
tehvPort Perry, Beaverton and 
Newniarket. Keswick will stage 
their home games oh Monday 
evenings % the Keswick arena. 
Ga^e time; is Sj p;m. Keswick 

books and will; have to defeat 
JSiftWi' Jl8Sle> Brilain andi Bea^ 
^yeglpa & advance Tntd ■ ihe OTMi 

HjV, pjaydownsi ■: ■ 
fiojden GohneTl was appolhted 

gSefe Gc^ Keswick p^l m^ 
ckc^ist; has beeri asked to accent 
the coaching; duties. Manager 
Connelli reports that inrircations 
ar^..fl|^$piljuii u tt' available for a 
cracker jack team and to make 
it a successful season, all that's 
needed is good support from the 
Keswick fans. 

Here*s the Keswick schedule: 

Jan. 3, Keswick at Beaverton; 
Jan. 7, Sutton at Keswick; Jan. 
IK Keswick at Port Perry; Jan. 

14, Port Perry at Keswick; Jan. 

15, Keswick at Newmarket; Jan. 
21, Newmarket at Keswick; Jan. 
23, Keswick at Little Britain; 
Jan. 28, Beaverton at Keswick; 

Feb. 4, Little Britain at Kes- „, 

wick; Feb. 7, Keswick at Sutton. I six goals, Laurie Thorns punched 



with the upheaval. 

The score actually was 6-2 
for the Spits when the boom was 
lowered. And the Spits were 
full value for that lead. They 
came out of the first period 
which was as full of crime as a 
10c detective novel, 3-2 leaders. 
It was Don. Smith from Bill 
Johnston and Ab. Shewchuk at 
3.16. Then Johnston shot as 
pretty a goal as you'll see on a 
pass from Don. Smith. Don. Gib- 
son then flew goalwards to pop 
in a Laurie Thorns* set-up relay. 

Spits lapsed for a minute and 
Collingwood sprayed in two 
quickies, Barney Walmsley beat- 
ing Joe Tunney, going good in 
goal, for the visitors' first and 
Len. Cook hit for the second. 
Spits had a round of three un- 
answered goals going in the sec- 
ond. Harold Tunstead tipped in 
a Bill Patrick rebound. It was 
Bill Johnston for his second goal 
on a pass from Don. Smith and 
the scoring was completed by 
Don. Gibson, assisted by Laurie 
Thorns at P. 10, 

■ 

SPLIT PAIR 

, ■ 

Optimism mixed with pessi- 
mism in the camp of the Spit* 
fires when the final returns \^pre 
in from the home and home ex- 
hibition junket with Bracebridge 
Bears. The Spits, skating and 
passing with more authority than 
in any previous game, blanketed 
iifc£ Bruins ;■» • 5, Oddly enough, 
when the teams resumed the re- 
turn game in the Muskoka center 
Saturday night the Bears look- 
ing like an entirely new team, 
nosed out our Spits 5 - f , 

In the clash here, the Spits 
made it look easy as they leaped 
ahead 8 - 2 in the first period 
and were up 10 - 3 at the end 
of two. That second period was 
the only round in which the visi- 
tors kept anywhere near the 
Spits. Spits wound up by out- 
scoring the visitors 9 - 2 in the 
finale. 

The Spits big scoring margin 
was the product of scoring happy 
Bill Johnston. Working on the 
wing-line, he ran in an amazing 



Aurora 

Elmira 
Nobleton 
Hespeler 
Fergus 

Bolton 



BIG SIX JUNIOR 

W L T 

5 2 1 

5 3 

3 3 1 

3 3 

3 4 ft 

15 



Nobleton 
King City 
Schomberg 

Kleinburg 

Bolton 

Kcttlebr 



KING-VATJGHAX 

W L T 

6 



o 
4 
3 

1 



1 

1 
5 
5 
6 



1 
2 




1 




Pts 

12 

10 

T 
6 
3 

Pts 

11 
10 

7 
6 
6 
2 

Pts 
13 
12 

8 



a 



OPTIMISTS NMI.L. 
VV L T 

Black Hawks 3 
Canadiens 2 10 

Rangers 111 

Leafs 12 

Bmins 12 

Red Wings o -** 1 

, NEWWARKET & DISTftfcf 

W L T 

6 10 
3 4 

3 4 
2 5 



Specialty 
ML Albert 

Town Regents 
Vandorf 



Pts 
6 
4 
3 
2 
Z 
1 

k, 

6 

4 



AURORA TOWN LEAGUE 

W L T Pts 
Ditch Diggers 4 
Victory Flyers 4 
Case's Aces 2 
Queen's Hotel 1 



1 



1 


1 

9 



9 

5 
Z 




Four players, Earl Lothian, 
Geo. Davis, Bill Mair and Bill 
Forhan, are tied for the scoring 
leadership in the Optimist's N. 
H. L. circuit. Standing to Jan. 1: 



■ - 


G 


A 


Pts 


E. Lothian <C) 


5 





5 


G. Davis (D) 


2 


3 


5 


W, Mair (D) 


1 


4 


5 


W. Forhan (B) 


1 


4 


5 


G. Keffer (R) 


3 


1 


4 


K. Cassavoy <D) 


a 


1 


4 


D. May (C) 


l 


3 


4 


D. MeKnight <L) 


2 


2 


4 


G. Morton <H) 


4 





4 


B Fines (H) 


3 


1 


- 4 


L. VanZant (H) 


3 


1 


4 


J. Cain <H) 


3 


1 


4 




■ " 



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EST RESULTS 



'SI 



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Keswick Comets, now Doastlng 
a 600 overage, one.win, one loss, 
have been staging home games on 
Wednesday lo date hut will swing 
over to Tuesday evenings hence- 
forth for their "at home" con- 
tests. The Cornels' proposed trip" 
to Woodvflle last Saturday night 
was cancelled due to lack of ice. 
Teams in the Tri-County Rural - 
'League are Sutton, Port Perry, 
llali burton, Keswick, Cannihftton. 
Little Britain, Woodville and 
Cambray, { 

Sutton, Port Perry and Hal I* 

burton carry a senior rating on 
the Tri-County books. The oilier' 
five including Keswick are clis* 
sed as intermediate. The* TH- 

County League plans to send 
three intermediate representa- 
tives in A, B and C classifications 
into Ihe Ontario playdowns. 



Plan Two Minor Teams 

Willi an eye to keeping Schom- 
berg up in the forefront in. dis- 
trict hockey, Schomberg hockey 

mwn plan to enter two rrinor 
hockey teams in the QJ.I.H.A. 
playdowns. Entries cover JuvenV 
He and bantam teams. Schom- 
berg Lions Club are sponsoring 
both teams. Doug Merchant has 
been named manager and Sill 
Breedon coach of Ihe teams. Pre- 
sent indications -are that the 
Schomberg representatives will 
be grouped with Bradford. Beet- 
on and AUiston. 



When he brings his order in plenty of 
time for the printer to do the best 

possible work 



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Hawks At Top 

Big time National Hockey rat- 
ings arc reversed in the Opti- 
mist's N.II.I* circuit opiraUn* 
here. Black Hawks are onTof 
locally. The Hawks took over 
undisputed possession of first 
place Friday with ft 4 - 3 whi 
over Belf Bradley's Leafs, 

In contest two, Bangers carved 
out a 4 - 1 victory over £anadi- 

ens. It was the Canucks' first 
loss, 

In contest three Don Warner's 

Br £ ns hit ,or **"* «»» **«i 

spillirui Redwings 6-4. i 






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